Degree Guides

100+ Degree Guides: Explore job opportunities in your field of study.

Read More

Top 15 Supply Chain Management Degree Jobs

By Agwaonye Samuel

Published:

Are you planning on entering the supply chain industry and getting a degree in supply chain management? The world of supply chain management is a domain where strategic coordination and leadership intersect to ensure the seamless flow of goods and services. We will delve into supply chain management jobs in this article, tailored for those with a supply chain management degree or those aspiring to attain one.

Whether you’re seeking to refine your career path or embark on a journey to acquire a degree in this field, our insightful guide will illuminate the diverse and rewarding job prospects that await you in the realm of supply chain management.

Let us look at our top 15 careers:

  • Supply Chain Analyst
  • Logistics Manager
  • Procurement Specialist
  • Operations Manager
  • Inventory Control Manager
  • Distribution Manager
  • Demand Planner
  • Supplier Relationship Manager
  • Production Scheduler
  • Global Trade Compliance Specialist
  • Supply Chain Consultant
  • E-commerce Fulfillment Manager
  • Quality Control Manager
  • Supply Chain Risk Manager
  • Sustainability Manager
degree guide supply chain management

1. Supply Chain Analyst


Supply Chain Analysts are professionals who specialize in optimizing the intricate networks that ensure the smooth flow of goods and services from production to consumption. They play a vital role in enhancing efficiency, reducing costs, and maintaining supply chain resilience.

As a Supply Chain Analyst

You are the architect behind the operational efficiency of supply chains. Your responsibilities encompass data analysis, strategic planning, and collaboration with various stakeholders to ensure products reach consumers seamlessly.

Benefits

  • Diverse Industries: Your skills are applicable across industries, from manufacturing and retail to healthcare and technology, offering a wide array of career opportunities.
  • Problem-Solving: Tackling complex supply chain challenges is at the heart of your role, allowing you to apply analytical thinking and creativity to find effective solutions.
  • Continuous Learning: The dynamic nature of supply chain management ensures a continuous learning curve as you adapt to evolving technologies and market trends.

Working Conditions

Supply Chain Analysts collaborate with departments like procurement, logistics, and operations. Your role involves using specialized software to analyze data and forecast demand. Effective communication skills are vital for coordinating efforts across different teams and ensuring the smooth execution of supply chain strategies.

Further Studies

  • Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP): Offered by APICS (Association for Supply Chain Management), this certification covers a wide range of topics in supply chain management, including planning, sourcing, production, delivery, and strategy.
  • Certified Professional in Supply Management (CPSM): Provided by the Institute for Supply Management (ISM), this certification focuses on procurement and sourcing strategies, contract management, supplier relationship management, and risk management.
  • Certification in Production and Inventory Management (CPIM): Also offered by APICS, CPIM certification is geared towards individuals involved in production and inventory management. It covers topics such as demand management, materials requirements planning, and capacity planning.
  • Certified Analytics Professional (CAP): While not specific to supply chain, this certification from INFORMS (Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences) validates expertise in analytics, including data analysis and decision-making skills that are valuable for Supply Chain Analysts.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

Supply Chain Analysts should possess strong analytical skills, attention to detail, and the ability to work with large datasets. Effective communication and problem-solving skills are essential for presenting insights to stakeholders and implementing improvements.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Salary Range ($56,000 to $69,000)
  • Job Outlook (5%)

Supply Chain Analyst salaries vary based on experience and industry, typically from $56,000 to $69,000 annually. The job outlook is promising and set at 5%, with an increasing emphasis on supply chain optimization and global trade.


2. Logistics Manager


Logistics Managers are the orchestrators of efficient transportation, distribution, and inventory management within supply chains. They are responsible for ensuring products reach their destination on time, in optimal condition, and at the lowest cost possible.

As a Logistics Manager

You hold the reins of the distribution process. Your role involves coordinating the movement of goods, managing warehouses, and collaborating with suppliers and transportation partners to maintain a seamless supply chain flow.

Benefits

  • Strategic Planning: You will gain the ability to foresee potential challenges, ensuring products are delivered to customers accurately and promptly.
  • Collaboration: You work closely with various stakeholders, from suppliers to distribution partners, fostering collaborative relationships that facilitate smooth operations.
  • Problem-Solving: Addressing unexpected disruptions and finding alternative routes or solutions to logistical challenges is a key aspect of your role.

Working Conditions

Logistics Managers oversee warehouses, distribution centers, and transportation operations. You’ll utilize technology and software to track shipments, manage inventory, and analyze data for informed decision-making. Strong organizational and communication skills are vital for effective coordination.

Further Studies

  • Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP): This certification focuses on end-to-end supply chain management, including logistics, operations, production, and planning.
  • Certified Professional in Logistics and Supply Chain Management (PLS): This certification covers logistics management, transportation, distribution, and supply chain strategy.
  • Certified Logistics Professional (CLP): It covers various aspects of logistics, including transportation, warehousing, inventory management, and supply chain strategy.
  • Certified International Trade Professional (CITP): his certification is ideal for logistics managers involved in global trade and covers topics such as international logistics, trade finance, and cultural considerations.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

Logistics Managers should possess excellent organizational skills, attention to detail, and a solution-oriented mindset. Effective communication and negotiation skills are crucial for managing relationships with suppliers, partners, and internal teams.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Salary Range ($60,000 to $103,000)
  • Job Outlook (6%)

Salaries for Logistics Managers vary based on experience and industry, typically ranging from $60,000 to $103,000 annually. The job outlook is stable and projected at 6%, with businesses recognizing the pivotal role of logistics in maintaining efficient supply chains.

Related Articles


3. Procurement Specialist


Procurement Specialists are experts in selecting suppliers, negotiating contracts, and managing the acquisition of goods and services essential for an organization’s operations. They play a pivotal role in ensuring cost-effective sourcing without compromising quality.

As a Procurement Specialist

You act as a bridge between suppliers and your organization. Your responsibilities include identifying reliable suppliers, negotiating favorable terms, and ensuring the timely delivery of goods and services required for seamless business operations.

Benefits

  • Diverse Industries: Procurement spans various industries, from manufacturing and retail to healthcare and technology.
  • Career Progression: Professionals can move into higher-level roles like Procurement Manager, Supply Chain Director, or Chief Procurement Officer, taking on more responsibility and broader strategic decision-making.
  • Job Demand: As organizations strive for efficient operations and cost control, the demand for skilled Procurement Specialists remains high. This career path offers stable job prospects and opportunities for growth in various industries.
  • Market Insight: You gain insights into market trends, supplier capabilities, and industry best practices, which are valuable assets in procurement decision-making.

Working Conditions

Procurement Specialists work in office environments, coordinating with various internal teams and external suppliers. You’ll use procurement software and tools to track orders, manage supplier relationships, and analyze purchasing data for continuous improvement.

Further Studies

  • Certified Professional in Supply Management (CPSM): Earning this certification can enhance your skills and marketability by validating your expertise in procurement practices.
  • Master’s in Procurement or Supply Chain Management: Pursuing an advanced degree provides a deeper understanding of procurement strategies, supplier management, and negotiation techniques.
  • Certified Professional in Supplier Diversity (CPSD): This certification focuses on supplier diversity and inclusion, an important aspect of modern procurement practices.
  • Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP): It is more comprehensive and covers various aspects of supply chain management, including procurement, production, distribution, and logistics.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

Procurement Specialists should possess strong negotiation skills, attention to detail, and market awareness. Effective communication and the ability to collaborate with cross-functional teams are vital for successful procurement operations.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Salary Range ($58,000 to $88,000)
  • Job Outlook (-6%)

Salaries for Procurement Specialists vary based on experience and industry, typically from $58,000 to $88,000 annually. The job outlook is expected to decline by 6%, despite this, organizations continually require experts to manage their procurement processes efficiently.


4. Operations Manager


Operations Managers are the architects of streamlined processes, ensuring that every facet of a business’s operations runs smoothly. They oversee various functions, from production and quality control to distribution and customer service, driving overall organizational efficiency.

As an Operations Manager

You are the conductor of the organizational symphony. Your role involves coordinating diverse teams, optimizing processes, and implementing strategies that lead to efficient and effective operations.

Benefits

  • Interdisciplinary Collaboration: You collaborate with various departments, from production to customer service, fostering communication and enhancing efficiency.
  • Operational Efficiency: Operations managers will learn more effective strategies to streamline processes, reduce costs, and improve the overall efficiency of an organization’s operations.
  • Competitive Salaries: Operation managers enjoy decent salaries as the job is tasking and involves coordination. 
  • Process Optimization: Operations Managers are key players in identifying bottlenecks, inefficiencies, and opportunities for improvement within operations.

Working Conditions

Operations Managers work in diverse settings, including manufacturing plants, offices, and warehouses. Your role requires coordination, communication, and problem-solving skills to ensure that all aspects of operations run smoothly.

Further Studies

  • Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP): This certification enhances your expertise in supply chain management, a key component of efficient operations.
  • Project Management Professional (PMP): Developing project management skills can enhance your ability to lead and coordinate complex operations.
  • Master of Business Administration (MBA): An MBA with a concentration in operations management can provide a broader business perspective and open doors to higher-level positions.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

Operations Managers should possess strong leadership skills, analytical thinking, and the ability to manage complex operations. Effective communication and decision-making skills are crucial for coordinating efforts across different teams and ensuring operational excellence.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Salary Range ($97,000 and $126,000)
  • Job Outlook (6%)

Operations managers’ salaries vary based on experience, location, and industry. On average, operations managers can earn between $97,000 and $126,000 per year. The job outlook is steady, with a projected growth rate of 6%, reflecting the ongoing need for effective operations management across industries.

Related Article


5. Inventory Control Manager


Inventory Control Managers are the custodians of a delicate equilibrium between supply and demand. They manage inventory levels, ensuring that products are available when needed while minimizing excess stock and associated costs.

As an Inventory Control Manager

You are the guardian of efficient inventory management. Your responsibilities encompass maintaining optimal stock levels, tracking inventory movements, and implementing strategies to enhance inventory turnover.

Benefits

  • Leadership Development: Managing a team of inventory specialists requires strong leadership skills. As an Inventory Control Manager, you have the opportunity to develop and refine your leadership abilities while guiding your team to success.
  • Cross-Functional Collaboration: This role involves close collaboration with various departments, such as procurement, logistics, and sales. Effective communication and teamwork are essential to ensure smooth coordination across different functions.
  • Career Growth: With experience and proven results, Inventory Control Managers can advance to higher-level positions within supply chain management or other managerial roles, offering a clear path for career growth.

Working Conditions

Inventory Control Managers work in various settings, including warehouses, distribution centers, and retail environments. You’ll utilize inventory management software to track stock levels, analyze data, and coordinate efforts to maintain optimal inventory levels.

Further Studies

  • Certified in Production and Inventory Management (CPIM): Earning this certification can enhance your production and inventory management skills, demonstrating expertise in inventory-related strategies.
  • Certified Inventory Optimization Professional (CIOP): This certification focuses specifically on inventory optimization strategies, helping professionals master techniques to balance inventory levels and costs effectively.
  • Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP): The CSCP program covers end-to-end supply chain management, which includes inventory control as a critical component.
  • Supply Chain Management Courses: Many universities and online platforms offer specialized courses in supply chain management, which can cover topics relevant to inventory control. Examples include courses on platforms like Coursera, edX, and LinkedIn Learning.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

Inventory Control Managers should possess strong analytical skills, attention to detail, and the ability to interpret data trends. Effective communication and collaboration skills are essential for working with cross-functional teams.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Salary Range ($89,000 to $117,000)
  • Job Outlook (1%)

Salaries for Inventory Control Managers vary based on experience and industry, typically between $89,000 to $117,000 annually. The job outlook is stable with a growth rate of 1% as organizations recognize the significance of efficient inventory management in maintaining operational effectiveness.


6. Distribution Manager


Distribution Managers are the conductors of a well-orchestrated delivery process, ensuring products move seamlessly from production to the hands of consumers. They oversee logistics, transportation, and warehousing to guarantee timely and efficient product distribution.a

As a Distribution Manager

You are responsible for the synchronized movement of goods within the supply chain. Your role involves managing transportation, coordinating with suppliers, and optimizing distribution networks to meet customer demands.

Benefits

  • Global Reach: You’ll have the opportunity to tap into international markets and expand the company’s reach.
  • Continuous Learning: This role keeps you on your toes, continuously learning about emerging technologies, industry trends, and consumer preferences.
  • Cross-Functional Collaboration: Distribution managers often work with various departments, such as marketing, sales, IT, logistics, and customer service. This collaboration exposes you to different aspects of the business and helps develop your interpersonal skills.

Working Conditions

Distribution managers work in office settings, collaborating with transportation providers, warehouse staff, and supply chain professionals. Their tasks may include route planning, inventory management, and monitoring distribution performance. They collaborate with cross-functional teams and may also work with external agencies or vendors.

Further Studies

  • Certified Professional in Supply Management (CPSM): This certification enhances your knowledge of supply chain principles and distribution strategies, which is valuable for effective distribution management.
  • Certified Logistics Professional (CLP): Offered by the American Society of Transportation and Logistics (ASTL), this certification covers various aspects of logistics management, including distribution and transportation.
  • Master’s in Supply Chain or Operations Management: Pursuing an advanced degree can provide in-depth knowledge of distribution network optimization and logistics management.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

As a strong candidate for this role, you should possess strong organizational skills, attention to detail, and the ability to coordinate complex logistics operations. Effective communication and problem-solving skills are vital for managing relationships with suppliers and transportation partners.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Salary Range ($50,000 and $106,000)
  • Job Outlook (6%)

Distribution managers’ salaries vary based on experience, location, and industry. On average, distribution managers can earn between $50,000 and $106,000 per year. The job outlook is steady, with a projected growth rate of 6%, reflecting the ongoing need for skilled professionals who can optimize distribution processes.


7. Demand Planner


Demand Planners are the forecasters of market trends and consumer preferences, ensuring that products are available when and where customers need them. They use data analysis and strategic planning to predict future demand and optimize inventory levels.

As a Demand Planner

You are the navigator of future market trends. Your role involves analyzing data, collaborating with various departments, and developing strategies that align inventory levels with projected customer demand.

Benefits

  • Global Perspective: As businesses operate in a global marketplace, demand planners need to consider international factors that can impact demand, such as geopolitical events, economic trends, and cultural influences. This provides a broader perspective on business operations.
  • Salary and Compensation: Skilled demand planners are often well-compensated due to the critical nature of their role in optimizing supply chain operations and minimizing costs.
  • Cross-Functional Collaboration: Demand planners work closely with various departments, including sales, marketing, production, and finance. This collaborative environment allows for exposure to different aspects of the business, fostering a well-rounded skill set.

Working Conditions

Demand Planners work in office environments, utilizing data analysis tools and software to project future demand. Collaboration with sales, marketing, and supply chain teams is essential to gather insights for accurate forecasting.

Further Studies

  • Certified Professional in Demand Forecasting (CPDF): This certification focuses on demand forecasting principles, techniques, and best practices. It covers topics such as statistical forecasting, demand management, and collaboration.
  • Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP): It covers a wide range of supply chain topics, including demand planning, inventory management, supply chain design, and logistics.
  • Association for Operations Management (APICS) Courses: APICS offers various courses related to supply chain management and demand planning. These courses cover topics like forecasting, inventory management, and production planning.
  • Master’s in Business Analytics: Pursuing an advanced degree in business analytics can provide a deeper understanding of data analysis techniques and predictive modeling.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

Demand Planners should possess strong analytical skills, attention to detail, and the ability to interpret data trends. Effective communication and collaboration skills are crucial for working with cross-functional teams.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Salary Range ($84,000 and $99,000)
  • Job Outlook (5%)

Salaries for Demand Planners vary based on experience and industry, typically between $84,000 and $99,000 annually. The job outlook is stable and set at 5% as organizations recognize the strategic importance of accurate demand forecasting.


8. Supplier Relationship Manager


Supplier Relationship Managers are the architects of strong partnerships, cultivating collaborative relationships with suppliers to ensure a reliable and efficient supply chain. They manage supplier interactions, negotiate contracts, and monitor performance to ensure seamless operations.

As a Supplier Relationship Manager

You are the bridge between your organization and its suppliers. Your role involves nurturing relationships, negotiating terms, and collaborating to ensure a consistent supply of goods and services.

Benefits

  • Innovation: By working closely with suppliers, you can tap into their expertise and insights, fostering innovation and improvements.
  • Cost Efficiency: Collaborative relationships with suppliers can lead to cost savings through favorable terms and efficient procurement processes.
  • Quality Assurance: Your role involves monitoring supplier performance to ensure that products meet quality standards and delivery expectations.

Working Conditions

Supplier Relationship Managers work in office environments, collaborating with procurement teams and suppliers. Your role requires effective communication, negotiation skills, and the ability to manage relationships.

Further Studies

  • Certified Professional in Supplier Diversity (CPSD): Earning this certification can enhance your skills in supplier management and relationship building.
  • Certified Professional in Supplier Management (CPSM): This certification covers various aspects of supplier management, including sourcing, negotiation, contract management, and supplier performance evaluation.
  • Certified Supplier Relationship Professional (CSRP): It is designed for procurement and supplier relationship professionals. It covers supplier performance management, risk management, and collaboration strategies.
  • Supplier Relationship Management (SRM) Training Courses: Various organizations and training providers offer SRM-specific courses that cover topics like supplier segmentation, performance measurement, risk assessment, and collaboration techniques.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

Supplier Relationship Managers should possess strong interpersonal skills, negotiation skills, and the ability to build and maintain relationships. Effective communication and collaboration skills are essential for working with cross-functional teams and suppliers.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Salary Range ($85,000 to $144,000)
  • Job Outlook (-6%)

Salaries for Supplier Relationship Managers vary based on experience and industry, typically ranging from $85,000 to $144,000 annually. The job outlook is projected to decline 6% as organizations do not recognize the strategic importance of strong supplier relationships in maintaining operational excellence.


9. Production Scheduler


Production Schedulers are the conductors of manufacturing timelines, orchestrating the production process to ensure products are made efficiently and delivered on time. They coordinate resources, equipment, and labor to optimize production schedules.

As a Production Scheduler

You are the timekeeper of manufacturing operations. Your role involves creating schedules, allocating resources, and coordinating with various departments to ensure seamless production processes.

Benefits

  • Career Growth: With experience and proven results, Inventory Control Managers can advance to higher-level positions within supply chain management or other managerial roles, offering a clear path for career growth.
  • Job Stability: Industries that rely on manufacturing and production processes always need skilled Production Schedulers to ensure operations run smoothly. This can provide a level of job stability even in changing economic conditions.
  • Customer Satisfaction: Timely production and delivery of goods contribute to customer satisfaction and loyalty.
  • Diverse Industries: Production scheduling skills are transferrable across a wide range of industries, including manufacturing, logistics, healthcare, and more. This versatility allows you to explore different sectors and expand your career opportunities.

Working Conditions

Production Schedulers work in manufacturing settings, collaborating with various departments such as production, logistics, and procurement. Utilizing scheduling software and tools is essential for creating and managing production timelines.

Further Studies

  • Certified Production and Inventory Management (CPIM): CPIM certification focuses on production, inventory control, and supply chain management. It covers forecasting, production planning, scheduling, and capacity management.
  • Certified Lean Six Sigma Green Belt (CLSSGB): Lean Six Sigma is a methodology that combines lean principles for process efficiency with Six Sigma’s focus on quality improvement. This certification can be valuable for improving production processes and minimizing waste.
  • Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP): Also offered by APICS, the CSCP certification covers end-to-end supply chain management, including production scheduling and planning.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

Production Schedulers should possess strong organizational skills, attention to detail, and the ability to manage complex production schedules. Effective communication and problem-solving skills are vital for coordinating efforts across different teams.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Salary Range ($54,000 to $73,000)
  • Job Outlook (1%)

Salaries for Production Schedulers vary based on experience and industry, typically from $54,000 to $73,000 annually. The job outlook is positive, with a growth rate of 1%, as organizations recognize the critical role of efficient production scheduling in meeting customer demands.


10. Global Trade Compliance Specialist


Global Trade Compliance Specialists are the guardians of international trade regulations, ensuring that products move seamlessly across borders while adhering to complex customs and trade laws. They play a pivotal role in minimizing risks and ensuring compliance in global supply chains.

As a Global Trade Compliance Specialist

You are the interpreter of international trade regulations. Your role involves staying updated on trade laws, managing customs documentation, and collaborating with cross-functional teams to ensure smooth cross-border transactions.

Benefits

  • Continuous Learning: International trade regulations are dynamic and subject to frequent changes. This dynamic nature keeps your work engaging and requires you to stay updated on evolving regulations, fostering continuous learning and professional growth.
  • Collaboration: Global trade compliance involves working with cross-functional teams, including legal, supply chain, and regulatory affairs. This collaborative environment hones your communication skills and allows you to learn from experts in various domains.
  • Advancement Opportunities: Experienced Global Trade Compliance Specialists often have opportunities for career advancement into managerial roles or specialized areas within compliance, such as export controls or sanctions.
  • Legal Expertise: Your role involves staying informed about ever-changing trade regulations, ensuring that your organization remains compliant.

Working Conditions

Global Trade Compliance Specialists work in office environments, collaborating with various procurement, logistics, and legal departments. Utilizing trade compliance software and tools is essential for managing customs documentation and ensuring adherence to regulations.

Further Studies

  • Certified Global Business Professional (CGBP): This certification covers a wide range of global business topics, including trade compliance. It’s a comprehensive credential for individuals involved in various aspects of international trade.
  • Certified Export Compliance Officer (CECO): It is specifically designed for professionals responsible for export compliance. It covers various aspects of export regulations, including ITAR and EAR.
  • Customs Compliance Certification (CCC): Focuses on customs compliance and regulations, which are essential for trade specialists dealing with import and export activities.
  • Global Professional in Trade Compliance (GPTC): Offered by the Global Trade Academy, this certification covers trade compliance and related areas such as export controls, sanctions, and anti-corruption measures.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

Global Trade Compliance Specialists should possess strong attention to detail, analytical thinking, and the ability to interpret complex trade regulations. Effective communication and collaboration skills are crucial for working with cross-functional teams.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Average Salary ($77,000)
  • Job Outlook (20%)

Salaries for Global Trade Compliance Specialists vary based on experience and industry, typically an average of $77,000 annually. The job outlook is promising, with a projected growth rate of 20%, as organizations recognize the significance of compliance in international trade.


11. Supply Chain Consultant


Supply Chain Consultants are the strategic advisors who guide organizations in optimizing their supply chain processes. They provide expert insights, analysis, and recommendations to enhance efficiency, reduce costs, and maximize overall performance.

As a Supply Chain Consultant

You are the strategist behind operational enhancements. Your role involves assessing existing supply chain processes, identifying areas for improvement, and devising strategies that align with the organization’s goals.

Benefits

  • Diverse Industry Exposure: You have the opportunity to work with a wide range of industries, from manufacturing and retail to healthcare and technology. This diversity exposes you to various business models, challenges, and strategies, enriching your understanding of how different sectors operate.
  • Continuous Learning: The field of supply chain management is dynamic, constantly evolving with technological advancements and industry trends. As a consultant, you’ll engage in continuous learning, staying updated on the latest tools, technologies, and best practices.
  • Collaboration: Supply Chain Consultants work closely with cross-functional teams within client organizations. This collaboration exposes you to professionals from different departments, broadening your network and fostering a holistic understanding of business operations.
  • Career Flexibility: This flexibility enables you to explore diverse career paths within supply chain management or even transition to related roles in operations, logistics, or management.

Working Conditions

Supply Chain Consultants typically work for consulting firms or as independent contractors. Your role involves engaging with clients, conducting assessments, and collaborating with cross-functional teams to implement recommendations.

Further Studies

  • Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP): Offered by APICS (Association for Supply Chain Management), the CSCP certification focuses on end-to-end supply chain management, including planning, production, distribution, and logistics.
  • Certified Professional in Supply Management (CPSM): Provided by the Institute for Supply Management (ISM), this certification covers strategic sourcing, contract negotiation, supplier relationship management, and other essential supply chain competencies.
  • Certification in Production and Inventory Management (CPIM): Also from APICS, this certification is focused on production planning, scheduling, inventory management, and control.
  • Certified Lean Six Sigma Green Belt or Black Belt: These certifications, offered by various organizations, including ASQ (American Society for Quality), focus on process improvement and waste reduction in supply chain operations.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

Supply Chain Consultants should possess strong analytical skills, problem-solving abilities, and effective communication. Adaptability to different industries and the ability to work collaboratively are crucial for delivering successful consulting services.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Salary Range ($85,000 to $136,000)
  • Job Outlook (5%)

Salaries for Supply Chain Consultants vary based on experience and industry, typically from $85,000 to $136,000 annually. The job outlook is positive and expected to grow 5% as organizations recognize the value of external expertise in optimizing supply chain operations.


12. E-Commerce Fulfillment Manager


E-Commerce Fulfillment Managers are the orchestrators of seamless online shopping experiences. They ensure that orders are processed, packed, and shipped efficiently, meeting customer expectations in the rapidly evolving world of online retail.

As an E-Commerce Fulfillment Manager

You are the conductor of online order fulfillment. Your role involves overseeing the entire fulfillment process, from order receipt to delivery, and ensuring timely and accurate execution.

Benefits

  • Cross-Functional Collaboration: This cross-functional interaction broadens your understanding of different business functions, fostering a holistic perspective of an e-commerce enterprise’s operations.
  • Technological Fluency: E-commerce relies heavily on technology, and as a Fulfillment Manager, you’ll become well-versed in various software and systems used for inventory management, order processing, and data analysis. Technological fluency enhances your digital skillset, making you adaptable in an increasingly tech-driven job market.
  • Leadership and Team Development: Managing fulfillment teams involves leadership, communication, and mentorship. Overseeing staff responsible for order picking, packing, and shipping allows you to develop valuable management skills while contributing to the growth and development of your team members.
  • Career Advancement: E-commerce Fulfillment Managers often have a clear path for career advancement. With experience, you can move into higher-level roles such as Director of E-commerce Operations or Supply Chain Manager, offering even more responsibilities, challenges, and rewards.

Working Conditions

E-commerce Fulfillment Managers work in e-commerce distribution centers, warehouses, or fulfillment centers. Collaboration with various teams, including inventory management, logistics, and customer service, is essential for seamless operations.

Further Studies

  • Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP): Offered by APICS (Association for Supply Chain Management), this certification focuses on end-to-end supply chain management, including topics like planning, sourcing, production, delivery, and return.
  • Certified Professional in E-commerce Operations (CPECO): This certification, offered by the E-commerce Operations Council, covers key areas related to e-commerce operations, including order processing, inventory management, fulfillment, and customer service.
  • Certified in Production and Inventory Management (CPIM): Also offered by APICS, this certification focuses on production and inventory management, which are crucial aspects of e-commerce fulfillment.
  • Certified Professional in Distribution and Warehousing (CPDW): This certification, offered by the International Warehouse Logistics Association (IWLA), covers topics related to warehouse management, distribution, and logistics.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

E-Commerce Fulfillment Managers should possess strong organizational skills, attention to detail, and the ability to manage complex fulfillment processes. Effective communication and problem-solving skills are vital for coordinating efforts across different teams.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Salary Range ($44,000 to $70,000)
  • Job Outlook (8%)

Salaries for E-commerce Fulfillment Managers vary based on experience and industry, typically ranging from $44,000 to $70,000 annually. The job outlook is expected to grow 8%, as the growth of e-commerce continues to drive demand for efficient fulfillment operations.


13. Quality Control Manager


A Quality Control Manager oversees and implements processes and standards to ensure consistent quality and adherence to the specifications of products or services.

As a Quality Control Manager

You are responsible for ensuring that products and services meet established quality standards. Your role involves developing and implementing quality assurance processes, conducting inspections, and driving continuous improvement to maintain product excellence.

Benefits

  • Job Stability and Demand: Quality control is an essential function in many industries, including manufacturing, healthcare, technology, automotive, and more. There will always be a demand for professionals who can ensure products meet quality standards, making it a relatively stable career choice.
  • Problem-Solving Opportunities: Quality Control Managers often encounter various challenges in identifying and resolving issues related to product quality. This provides excellent opportunities to develop problem-solving and analytical skills.
  • Continuous Learning: The field of quality control is constantly evolving, with new technologies, methodologies, and best practices emerging.
  • Industry Versatility: Quality Control skills are transferable across various industries, making it possible for managers to explore different sectors throughout their careers.

Working Conditions

Quality control managers work in manufacturing or production facilities, collaborating with production teams, engineers, and quality assurance professionals. Your tasks may include designing quality control procedures, conducting audits, and implementing corrective actions.

Further Studies

  • Certified Quality Manager (CQM): This certification validates your expertise in quality management principles and practices, enhancing your credibility as a quality control professional.
  • Six Sigma Green Belt or Black Belt Certification: These certifications focus on process improvement and statistical analysis, valuable for quality control managers seeking to optimize processes.
  • Master’s in Quality Management: An advanced degree program specifically focused on quality management can provide a comprehensive understanding of quality principles and their application.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

You should possess strong attention to detail, analytical skills, effective communication abilities, and a passion for ensuring product quality and process improvement. and a deep understanding of quality assurance methodologies.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Salary Range ($107,000 and $136,000)
  • Job Outlook (-3%)

Quality control managers’ salaries vary based on experience, location, and industry. The base salary for quality control managers can earn from $107,000 and $136,000 per year. The job outlook is steady, with a projected decline rate of 3%, reflecting the ongoing need for skilled professionals who can ensure product quality and consistency.


14. Supply Chain Risk Manager


Supply Chain Risk Managers are the guardians of resilience, preparing organizations to weather unexpected disruptions that can impact the supply chain. They identify potential risks, develop mitigation strategies, and ensure business continuity.

As a Supply Chain Risk Manager

You are the sentinel of preparedness. Your role involves assessing potential risks, developing contingency plans, and collaborating with cross-functional teams to minimize the impact of disruptions.

Benefits

  • Job Demand: The need for skilled Supply Chain Risk Managers is on the rise as companies recognize the importance of risk management in maintaining efficient operations. This demand translates into a variety of job opportunities and competitive compensation packages.
  • Career Growth: Starting as a Supply Chain Risk Analyst, you can progress to more senior roles like Director of Supply Chain Risk Management or Chief Risk Officer. The skills and expertise you develop in risk management can open doors to leadership positions.
  • Global Perspective: As supply chains become increasingly global, Supply Chain Risk Managers gain exposure to international business practices and cultural nuances. This global perspective can enrich your professional experience and broaden your horizons.
  • Collaboration: Supply Chain Risk Managers work closely with various departments, including procurement, logistics, finance, and legal. This collaborative nature of the role allows you to build strong cross-functional relationships and expand your professional network.

Working Conditions

Supply Chain Risk Managers typically work in office environments, collaborating with various departments such as procurement, logistics, and finance. Utilizing risk management software and tools is essential for assessing and addressing potential risks.

Further Studies

  • Certified Professional in Supply Management (CPSM): Provided by the Institute for Supply Management (ISM), this certification program covers procurement and supply management, which are closely related to supply chain risk management.
  • Certified Supply Chain Risk Professional (CSCRP): Offered by the Supply Chain Risk Management Consortium, this certification is specifically tailored for professionals in supply chain risk management. It covers topics like risk assessment, risk monitoring, and risk response strategies.
  • Certified in Risk and Information Systems Control (CRISC): While not specific to supply chain, this ISACA certification focuses on managing and mitigating IT-related risks, which can be highly relevant in today’s technology-driven supply chains.
  • Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP): Earning this certification can enhance your skills in supply chain risk management, demonstrating expertise in risk identification and mitigation.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

Supply Chain Risk Managers should possess strong analytical skills, critical thinking abilities, and the ability to foresee potential risks. Effective communication and collaboration skills are crucial for working with cross-functional teams.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Salary Range ($95,000 to $157,000)
  • Job Outlook (5%)

Salaries for Supply Chain Risk Managers vary based on experience and industry, typically ranging from $95,000 to $157,000 annually. The job outlook is positive, with a growth rate of 5%, as organizations recognize the importance of proactive risk management in maintaining supply chain resilience.


15. Sustainability Manager


Sustainability Managers are the champions of environmentally responsible practices within supply chains. They develop and implement strategies to reduce environmental impact, enhance social responsibility, and promote ethical sourcing.

As a Sustainability Manager

You are the advocate for responsible supply chain practices. Your role involves assessing environmental and social impacts, developing sustainable initiatives, and collaborating with cross-functional teams to drive positive change.

Benefits

  • Diverse and Dynamic Role: Sustainability management involves a wide range of responsibilities. This variety keeps the job engaging and intellectually stimulating.
  • Professional Growth: Staying updated with the latest trends, technologies, and best practices keeps you at the forefront of sustainable business strategies.
  • Cross-Functional Collaboration: Sustainability Managers work closely with different teams within an organization. This collaborative aspect allows you to interact with professionals from various backgrounds, including marketing, supply chain, operations, and more.

Working Conditions

Sustainability Managers work in office environments, collaborating with various departments such as procurement, operations, and marketing. Utilizing sustainability assessment tools and software is essential for measuring and improving environmental and social impacts.

Further Studies

  • LEED Green Associate or LEED Accredited Professional: Offered by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), the LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) credentials demonstrate sustainable building practices and design expertise.
  • Certified Energy Manager (CEM): This certification, offered by the Association of Energy Engineers (AEE), focuses on energy efficiency, conservation, and management strategies.
  • Certified Sustainable Development Professional (CSDP): Offered by the Institute for Sustainable Infrastructure (ISI), this certification focuses on sustainable infrastructure development and management.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

Sustainability Managers should possess strong analytical skills, an understanding of environmental regulations, and the ability to drive change through persuasion and collaboration. Effective communication and stakeholder engagement skills are vital for promoting sustainability initiatives.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Average Salary ($89,000)
  • Job Outlook (6%)

Salaries for Sustainability Managers vary based on experience and industry, typically an average of $89,000 annually. The job outlook is expected to grow by 6% as organizations recognize the importance of integrating sustainability into their supply chain strategies.

Making the Right Career Choice

In a world driven by intricate global networks and dynamic market demands, the field of supply chain management emerges as a cornerstone of modern business operations. This comprehensive exploration of the top 15 supply chain management degree jobs has shed light on the diverse and essential roles that professionals in this field undertake. From orchestrating seamless logistics to optimizing data-driven decisions, these roles collectively form the backbone of efficient, sustainable, and successful supply chain ecosystems.

As the supply chain landscape continues to evolve, these roles remain at the forefront of shaping a resilient and interconnected global economy.


Agwaonye Samuel

About the Author

Read more articles by Agwaonye Samuel


Create a Professional Resume for free!

No-sign up or payment required.