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Top 15 Public Health Degree Jobs

By Agwaonye Samuel

Published:

Are you interested in joining the health industry and getting a degree in Public Health to kick-start your career? In today’s ever-evolving world, the significance of public health has never been more apparent.

In this concise guide, we present 15 rewarding career paths that individuals with a public health degree can embark upon, exploring their impact and the diverse opportunities they offer. Whether you’re a recent graduate or considering a career change, join us on this journey as we uncover the most sought-after and impactful roles in the field of public health.

Let us take a look at our top 15 careers:

  • Epidemiologist
  • Health Educator
  • Biostatistician
  • Environmental Health Specialist
  • Health Policy Analyst
  • Public Health Program Manager
  • Global Health Specialist
  • Community Health Worker
  • Occupational Health and Safety Specialist
  • Health Services Manager
  • Health Communications Specialist
  • Public Health Consultant
  • Public Health Researcher
  • Infectious Disease Specialist
  • Maternal and Child Health Specialist
degree guide public health

1. Epidemiologist


An Epidemiologist investigates patterns and causes of diseases within populations, aiming to understand and control the spread of illnesses and improve public health.

As an Epidemiologist

You will analyze health data, conduct research, and develop strategies to prevent and control disease outbreaks.

Benefits

  • Global Health: Many epidemiologists work on global health issues, collaborating with international organizations to address diseases on a global scale.
  • Global Collaboration: Collaborating with researchers and organizations worldwide fosters a sense of global health community.
  • Research Diversity: Epidemiology covers a wide range of health topics, from infectious diseases to chronic conditions, providing diverse research opportunities.

Working Conditions

Epidemiologists typically work in office settings, research institutions, or government agencies. They collaborate with healthcare professionals, researchers, and policymakers.

Further Studies

  • Certified Epidemiologist (CEpi): This certification recognizes individuals with a strong epidemiology and public health practice background.
  • Certification in Public Health (CPH): This certification is not specific to epidemiology, it demonstrates a broad understanding of public health principles and can be beneficial for epidemiologists working in public health settings.
  • Master’s or Doctoral Degree in Epidemiology: Pursuing advanced studies provides specialized knowledge and research opportunities.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

Excelling as an Epidemiologist involves having strong analytical skills, being good at research, paying close attention to details, and knowing about statistical methods. Moreover, being able to explain complicated data to different groups of people is really important in this job.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Salary Range ($90,000 and $126,000)
  • Job Outlook (26%)

Epidemiologists’ salaries vary based on experience, location, and sector. They can earn between $90,000 and $126,000 per year. The job outlook is favorable, with a projected growth rate of 26%, indicating a demand for skilled epidemiologists.


2. Health Educator


A Health Educator designs and delivers educational programs to promote health awareness and encourage healthy behaviors within communities or organizations.

As a Health Educator

You will develop and implement programs to educate communities and individuals about health-related topics. Health Educators promote healthy behaviors and lifestyles to improve overall well-being.

Benefits

  • Personal Fulfillment: Witnessing positive behavior change and improved health outcomes can be personally rewarding.
  • Flexible Career Path: Health educators can work in various settings, including schools, healthcare facilities, community centers, and non-profit organizations.
  • Communication Skills: Health educators hone their communication skills to convey complex health information clearly and relatable.
  • Community Engagement: This role involves working closely with diverse populations and community organizations.

Working Conditions

Health Educators work in various settings, such as schools, healthcare facilities, and community centers. They interact with individuals and groups to deliver health education programs.

Further Studies

  • Master’s in Public Health, Health Education, or Community Health: Advanced education can provide deeper insights into health promotion strategies, program development, and health behavior change.
  • Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) Certification: Earning a recognized health education certification enhances your expertise and industry recognition.
  • Behavior Change and Health Communication Courses: Developing skills in behavior change theories and effective health communication is essential for successful health education.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

To be considered a Health Educator, you must be good at talking to others, understand different cultures, be creative, and care about public health. It’s also important to create interesting educational materials and adjust programs to suit different kinds of people.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Salary Range ($41,000 and $67,000)
  • Job Outlook (12%)

Health educators’ salaries vary based on location, work setting, and level of experience. On average, they can earn between $41,000 and $67,000 per year. The job outlook for health educators is projected at 12% as communities continue to prioritize health education and disease prevention.

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3. Biostatistician


A Biostatistician employs statistical techniques to analyze biological and medical research data, facilitating the interpretation and meaningful insights from scientific studies.

As a Biostatistician

You will apply statistical methods to analyze health-related data and conduct research in public health and biomedical fields. Biostatisticians play a vital role in designing studies, interpreting data, and drawing meaningful conclusions.

Benefits

  • Continuous Learning: The dynamic nature of the field offers continuous learning and exposure to evolving statistical techniques.
  • Academic and Research Opportunities: Many biostatisticians work in academia, contributing to teaching and research at universities and research institutions.
  • Research Collaboration: This role involves collaborating with researchers and healthcare professionals to analyze complex data.
  • Public Health Policy: Statistical analysis informs public health policies and guidelines that impact population health and well-being.

Working Conditions

Biostatisticians typically work in academic institutions, research organizations, or pharmaceutical companies. They use statistical software and collaborate with interdisciplinary teams.

Further Studies

  • Certified Specialist in Biostatistics (CSB): This certification is designed for professionals with substantial biostatistics experience and expertise. Candidates are required to demonstrate their knowledge through an examination.
  • Society for Clinical Trials (SCT) Certification: The Certified Clinical Trials Professional (CCTP) designation validates a comprehensive understanding of clinical trial methodology, ethics, and regulations.
  • Certificate in Applied Biostatistics: Many universities and institutions offer certificate programs in applied biostatistics. These programs are often designed for individuals who want to gain practical skills in biostatistics without pursuing a full master’s degree.
  • Master’s or Doctoral Degree in Biostatistics: Pursuing advanced studies provides specialized knowledge in biostatistical methodologies.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

Being a Biostatistician involves having solid math and statistical skills, being good at analyzing things, paying attention to details, and really caring about research. Moreover, being able to explain complicated statistical ideas to people who aren’t statisticians is very important in this job.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Salary Range ($85,000 and $130,000)
  • Job Outlook (31%)

Biostatisticians’ salaries vary based on experience, location, and industry. They can earn between $85,000 and $130,000 per year. The job outlook is favorable and set to increase by 31%, with an increasing demand for statisticians in healthcare and research settings.


4. Environmental Health Specialist


An Environmental Health Specialist assesses and addresses potential environmental hazards to safeguard public health and well-being.

As an Environmental Health Specialist

You will focus on identifying and mitigating environmental factors affecting public health. They assess environmental risks, enforce regulations, and promote health in communities.

Benefits

  • Fieldwork: The role often involves fieldwork, site inspections, and assessments to identify potential hazards and risks.
  • Interdisciplinary Collaboration: Specialists work alongside public health officials, scientists, engineers, and policymakers to address complex environmental health issues.
  • Professional Growth: Environmental health specialists have opportunities for specialization, advanced certifications, and career advancement.

Working Conditions

Environmental Health Specialists work in government agencies, environmental organizations, or consulting firms. They conduct site visits and collaborate with environmental experts and public health professionals.

Further Studies

  • Registered Environmental Health Specialist (REHS) or Registered Sanitarian (RS): These certifications are often considered a standard for environmental health professionals. They demonstrate a strong knowledge of various environmental health principles, including food safety, water quality, wastewater management, vector control, and more.
  • Certified Professional – Food Safety (CP-FS): It is specifically tailored to professionals involved in food safety. It covers foodborne illnesses, HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points), and regulatory compliance.
  • Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant (CIEC): For those focusing on indoor air quality and environmental concerns within buildings, this certification from the American Council for Accredited Certification (ACAC) is valuable.
  • Certified Environmental Health Professional (CEHP): Earning the CEHP certification showcases expertise in environmental health.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

An Environmental Health Specialist should have a deep understanding of environmental health rules, good problem-solving skills, effective communication, and be really careful with details. Also, working well with different groups of people and finding solutions for complicated environmental health issues is very important in this job.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Salary Range ($50,000 to $90,000)
  • Job Outlook (5%)

Environmental Health specialists’ salaries vary based on experience, location, and employer. On average, they can earn from $50,000 to $90,000 per year. The job outlook is positive and expected to grow by 5%, with a growing need for analysts to influence healthcare policies.


5. Health Policy Analyst


A Health Policy Analyst examines and evaluates healthcare policies and their potential impact, providing insights and recommendations for informed decision-making.

As a Health Policy Analyst

Health Policy Analysts focus on analyzing healthcare policies and proposing recommendations to improve the overall healthcare system. They assess the impact of policies on public health and advocate for evidence-based changes.

Benefits

  • Policy Implementation: The role involves working with policymakers to ensure effective policy implementation and monitoring.
  • Positive Work Environment: Contributing to healthcare improvements creates a rewarding and fulfilling work environment.
  • Career Growth: The field offers opportunities for advancement, specialization, and leadership roles in healthcare and public health organizations.

Working Conditions

Health Policy Analysts work in government agencies, think tanks, and healthcare organizations. They collaborate with policymakers, researchers, and advocacy groups.

Further Studies

  • Certified Professional in Healthcare Quality (CPHQ): This certification is not specific to policy analysis; it’s relevant for individuals involved in healthcare quality improvement, which often intersects with health policy considerations.
  • Certified in Public Health (CPH): It is designed for public health professionals, including policy analysts. It covers a broad range of public health topics, including policy and advocacy.
  • Certified Professional in Patient Safety (CPPS): This certification is relevant for policy analysts working on patient safety initiatives and policies.
  • Master’s in Public Health (MPH) with a focus on Health Policy: Pursuing an advanced degree provides specialized knowledge in health policy analysis.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

Being successful as a Health Policy Analyst relies on having strong analytical skills, being skilled at policy research, communicating effectively, and understanding how healthcare systems work. Moreover, finding gaps in policies and suggesting solutions backed by evidence is a key aspect of this role.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Salary Range ($61,000 to $79,000)
  • Job Outlook (-2%)

Health Policy Analysts’ salaries vary based on experience, location, and employer. On average, they can earn from $61,000 to $79,000 per year. The job outlook is set to decline by 2%, with a slow-growing need for analysts to influence healthcare policies.


6. Public Health Program Manager


A Public Health Program Manager coordinates and oversees initiatives to improve and promote community health within a specific program area.

As a Public Health Program Manager

Public Health Program Managers oversee and coordinate public health programs designed to address specific health issues or populations. They manage program budgets, evaluate outcomes, and collaborate with stakeholders to achieve program objectives.

Benefits

  • Leadership Opportunities: Health program managers often lead teams, oversee staff, and coordinate multi-disciplinary efforts.
  • Community Engagement: This role involves working closely with communities and partners to address public health needs.
  • Leadership Development: Program Managers have the opportunity to lead and mentor public health professionals.

Working Conditions

Public Health Program Managers work in government agencies, non-profit organizations, and public health departments. They collaborate with program teams, community leaders, and funding organizations.

Further Studies

  • Certified in Public Health (CPH): It validates the essential knowledge and skills needed by public health professionals, including program managers. It covers a wide range of public health topics and demonstrates a commitment to the field.
  • Project Management Professional (PMP): While not specific to public health, the PMP certification from the Project Management Institute (PMI) is highly regarded and can be beneficial for program managers. It focuses on project management principles, tools, and techniques.
  • Certified in Healthcare Public Relations (CHPR): For program managers involved in healthcare-related public health programs, this Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) certification can provide insights into effective communication and public relations strategies.
  • Certified in Public Health Management (CPHM): This is designed for public health managers and leaders. It covers topics such as leadership, management, and communication.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

A strong candidate for this role requires strong project management skills, good leadership, effective communication, and a solid grasp of public health principles. Moreover, being able to adjust programs to match evolving community needs and showing how programs make a difference is vital in this role.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Salary Range ($80,000 and $126,000)
  • Job Outlook (28%)

Public Health Program Managers’ salaries vary based on experience, location, and organization size. On average, they can earn between $80,000 and $126,000 per year. The job outlook is impressive and projected to grow 28%, with a growing emphasis on evidence-based public health programs.


7. Global Health Specialist


A Global Health Specialist focuses on analyzing and addressing health issues on a worldwide scale, considering cultural, social, and economic factors that impact public well-being.

As a Global Health Specialist

You will improve health outcomes in international settings, addressing health disparities and promoting health equity worldwide.

Benefits

  • Passion for Global Health: The role allows individuals to actively contribute to addressing health challenges on a global scale.
  • Global Collaboration: Collaborating with international partners fosters a sense of global health community and shared goals.
  • Cross-Cultural Experience: This role involves working with people from diverse cultures and backgrounds.

Working Conditions

Global Health Specialists work in non-governmental organizations, international agencies, or government programs. They collaborate with global health experts and local communities.

Further Studies

  • Certified Global Health Professional (CGHP): The Global Health Council offers this certification for individuals who demonstrate proficiency in global health competencies. It covers health systems, cross-cultural communication, program evaluation, and more.
  • Global Health Certificate Programs: Many universities and institutions offer online or in-person certificate programs in global health. These programs cover a range of topics, including global health policy, infectious diseases, maternal and child health, and healthcare delivery in resource-limited settings.
  • Certificate in Tropical Medicine and International Health: Some institutions offer specialized training in tropical medicine and health issues commonly found in low-resource settings. This training can be especially valuable for global health specialists who work in regions with specific health challenges.
  • Master’s in Global Health: Pursuing an advanced degree provides specialized knowledge in global health policies and programs.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

Strong cross-cultural communication skills, adaptability, empathy, and a commitment to addressing global health disparities are essential for success as a Global Health Specialist. Additionally, navigating complex global health challenges and working effectively in diverse environments is crucial in this role.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Average Salary ($113,000)
  • Job Outlook (5%)

Global Health Specialists’ salaries vary based on experience, location, and organization. They can earn an average salary of $113,000 per year. The job outlook is promising, with a growth rate of 5%, and an increasing emphasis on global health initiatives.


8. Community Health Worker


A Community Health Worker collaborates with local residents and healthcare providers to promote wellness, deliver health education, and facilitate access to medical and social services within the community.

As a Community Health Worker

You act as a bridge between communities and healthcare services. Community Health Workers (CHWs) provide health education, support healthcare access, and advocate for community needs.

Benefits

  • Skill Transferability: The skills gained as a CHW can be valuable for further education and career advancement in healthcare and related fields.
  • Variety of Tasks: CHWs perform a variety of tasks, making each day dynamic and engaging.
  • Skill Development: The role develops skills in communication, health education, advocacy, and community outreach.
  • Positive Work Relationships: Building trusting relationships with community members and healthcare providers is a rewarding aspect of the role.

Working Conditions

Community Health Workers work in community-based organizations, public health departments, and healthcare settings. They collaborate with community members, healthcare providers, and social service agencies.

Further Studies

  • Certified Community Health Worker (CCHW): Various organizations offer this certification and demonstrate that you have met certain competency standards for CHWs.
  • Community Health Worker Core Competency Training Programs: These programs provide comprehensive training on the foundational skills and knowledge required for CHWs. They cover communication, cultural competency, advocacy, and health education.
  • State-Specific Certifications: Some states have their own certification programs for CHWs. Check with your state’s health department or relevant agencies to see if your area has specific certification requirements.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

Strong interpersonal skills, cultural competence, empathy, and a passion for community health are essential for success as a Community Health Worker. Additionally, connecting community members with appropriate resources and navigating healthcare systems is crucial in this role.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Salary Range ($50,000 and $69,000)
  • Job Outlook (15%)

Community Health Workers’ salaries vary based on experience, location, and employer. On average, they can earn between $50,000 and $69,000 per year. The job outlook is progressive and set to grow 15%, with ongoing demand for researchers to inform public health policies.

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9. Occupational Health and Safety Specialist


An Occupational Health and Safety Specialist assesses workplace environments, implements safety protocols, and provides guidance to ensure the well-being of employees and compliance with health and safety regulations.

As an Occupational Health Specialist

Occupational Health Specialists focus on promoting health and safety in the workplace. They assess workplace hazards, implement safety programs, and provide support to employees.

Benefits

  • Interdisciplinary Collaboration: Occupational health and safety specialists work with management, human resources, healthcare professionals, and regulatory agencies.
  • Work-Life Balance: Occupational health and safety specialists often promote work-life balance and employee well-being.
  • Employee Well-being: This role involves supporting employees’ health and preventing work-related injuries and illnesses.

Working Conditions

Occupational Health Specialists may work in occupational health departments, corporations, or consulting firms. They collaborate with employers, safety personnel, and healthcare professionals.

Further Studies

  • Certified Occupational Health Nurse (COHN): Earning the COHN certification demonstrates expertise in occupational health.
  • Certified Industrial Hygienist (CIH): This certification is intended for professionals who focus on identifying and controlling workplace health hazards, including chemical, physical, and biological agents.
  • Certified Safety Professional (CSP): It is suitable for professionals responsible for ensuring workplace safety and health through hazard recognition, evaluation, and control.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

Being an Occupational Health Specialist demands solid familiarity with occupational health rules, being skilled at assessing risks, communicating well, and genuinely caring about keeping workplaces safe. Furthermore, the ability to create and put in place safety programs tailored to meet unique workplace requirements is pivotal for success in this role.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Salary Range ($47,000 and $58,000)
  • Job Outlook (8%)

Occupational Health Specialists’ salaries vary based on experience, location, and employer. They can earn between $47,000 and $58,000 per year. The job outlook is set at 8%, with organizations recognizing the importance of occupational health in maintaining a productive workforce.

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10. Health Services Manager


Health Services Managers, also known as Healthcare Administrators or Medical and Health Services Managers, oversee the operations of healthcare facilities and organizations.

As a Health Services Manager

You are responsible for strategic planning, financial management, and ensuring the delivery of high-quality patient care.

Benefits

  • Healthcare Leadership: Health services managers are leaders who play a vital role in guiding and managing healthcare organizations and teams.
  • Community Engagement: Managers engage with the community, patients, and families to understand healthcare needs and improve services.
  • Professional Development: The field offers opportunities for career growth, skill development, and specialization in different healthcare sectors.

Working Conditions

Health Services Managers work in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, and other healthcare settings. They collaborate with healthcare professionals, administrative staff, and regulatory agencies.

Further Studies

  • Certified Healthcare Administrative Professional (cHAP): Validates the skills and knowledge required for administrative professionals in healthcare settings. It covers healthcare operations, communication, compliance, and patient-centered care.
  • Certified Medical Manager (CMM): Designed for healthcare managers and office administrators. It focuses on medical practice management, financial management, human resources, and regulatory compliance.
  • Certified Professional in Healthcare Quality (CPHQ): Geared toward healthcare professionals involved in quality improvement and patient safety. It covers topics like healthcare regulations, performance measurement, and patient-centered care.
  • Certified Healthcare Facility Manager (CHFM): The American Hospital Association (AHA) offers this certification for healthcare facility managers. It covers healthcare regulations, building systems, maintenance, and facility planning.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

Being a Health Services Manager requires strong leadership, knowledge about finances, good strategic planning, and an understanding of healthcare rules. Moreover, adjusting to new healthcare policies and leading improvements within the organization is vital in this role.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Salary Range ($101,000 and $120,000)
  • Job Outlook (28%)

Health Services Managers’ salaries vary based on experience, location, and healthcare facility size. On average, they can earn a salary of $101,000 and $120,000 per year. The job outlook is projected to grow 28%, with an increasing demand for managers to navigate complex healthcare systems.


11. Health Communications Specialist


A Health Communications Specialist designs and executes plans to communicate health information to the public to raise awareness and promote understanding of medical matters and preventive actions.

As a Health Communications Specialist

You should focus on developing and implementing communication strategies to promote public health initiatives and educate the community about health-related issues. Health Communications specialists use various communication channels to disseminate important health information.

Benefits

  • Positive Work Environment: Contributing to positive health outcomes and informed decision-making creates a fulfilling work environment.
  • Stakeholder Collaboration: Communications specialists collaborate with healthcare professionals, researchers, policymakers, and community leaders.
  • Multi-Media Skills: The role involves creating content across various media, including written, visual, digital, and social media platforms.

Working Conditions

Health Communications Specialists work in government health departments, non-profit organizations, and healthcare agencies. They collaborate with public health experts, marketing teams, and community partners.

Further Studies

  • Certified Professional Healthcare Quality (CPHQ): While not solely focused on communication, this certification is designed for healthcare quality improvement and patient safety professionals. Effective communication is a crucial aspect of ensuring patient safety and quality care.
  • Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES): The National Commission for Health Education Credentialing (NCHEC) offers this certification for individuals with a strong health education and promotion foundation. While not solely focused on communications, it covers a broad range of health education topics relevant to health communication specialists.
  • Certified in Public Health (CPH): This certification is provided by the National Board of Public Health Examiners (NBPHE) and is intended for public health professionals. While it doesn’t specifically focus on communications, it validates your expertise in various public health areas, which can be valuable for a health communications career.
  • Master’s in Public Health (MPH) with a focus on Health Communication: Pursuing an advanced degree provides specialized knowledge in health communication strategies.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

You need effective communication, creativity, know-how in marketing, and a solid grasp of public health concepts. Moreover, being able to craft messages for various audiences and measure the impact of communication campaigns is vital for success in this role.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Salary Range ($66,000 to $87,000)
  • Job Outlook (12%)

Health Communications Specialists’ salaries vary based on experience, location, and employer. They can earn an average of $66,000 to $87,000 per year. The job outlook is set to increase by 12%, with an increasing need for effective health communication in public health campaigns.


12. Public Health Consultant


A Public Health Consultant provides expert advice and recommendations to organizations and communities to improve health outcomes and address public health challenges.

As a Public Health Consultant

Public Health Consultants provide expert advice to organizations and governments on public health matters. They assess health needs, develop strategies, and implement programs to improve population health.

Benefits

  • Flexibility: Public health consultants often have the flexibility to work on a variety of projects with different clients.
  • Professional Development: The field offers opportunities for specialization, skill development, and staying updated on public health trends.
  • Diverse Clientele: This role offers opportunities to work with various organizations and government agencies.

Working Conditions

Public Health Consultants may work as independent contractors or within consulting firms. They collaborate with clients, public health experts, and policymakers.

Further Studies

  • Certified in Public Health (CPH): This certification is provided by the National Board of Public Health Examiners (NBPHE) and is intended for public health professionals. While it doesn’t specifically focus on communications, it validates your expertise in various public health areas, which can be valuable for a health communications career.
  • Certification in Infection Prevention and Control (CIC): Offered by the Certification Board of Infection Control and Epidemiology (CBIC), this certification focuses on preventing healthcare-associated infections and managing outbreaks.
  • Master Certified Health Education Specialist (MCHES): These certifications, offered by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing (NCHEC), focus on health education and promotion, which are integral to public health consulting.
  • Master’s in Public Health (MPH) with a focus on Health Policy or Management: Pursuing an advanced degree provides specialized knowledge in public health consulting.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

Being a Public Health Consultant requires strong problem-solving skills, research capabilities, effective communication, and a comprehensive understanding of public health matters. Moreover, the ability to customize recommendations for various situations and groups is vital for success in this role.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Average Salary ($72,000)
  • Job Outlook (14%)

Public Health Consultants’ earnings vary based on experience, location, and consulting firm. On average, they can earn a salary of $72,000 per year. The job outlook is set to grow by 14%, with organizations seeking expert advice to address public health challenges.


13. Public Health Researcher


A Public Health Researcher conducts studies and investigations to gather data and insights that contribute to advancing knowledge and informing policies in the field of public health.

As a Public Health Researcher

Your responsibility will include analyze data, publish research findings, and contribute to scientific knowledge in the field.

Benefits

  • Academic Engagement: Many researchers work in academic institutions, contributing to teaching and mentoring the next generation of public health professionals.
  • Health Promotion: Research can lead to the development of health promotion campaigns that raise awareness and encourage healthy behaviors.
  • Passion for Public Health: The role allows individuals to combine their passion for research with a focus on improving population health.

Working Conditions

Public Health Researchers work in academic institutions, research organizations, or government agencies. They collaborate with other researchers, public health experts, and policymakers.

Further Studies

  • Master Certified Health ECertified in Public Health (CPH): Offered by the National Board of Public Health Examiners (NBPHE), the CPH certification demonstrates a researcher’s competence in the core areas of public health. It covers epidemiology, biostatistics, environmental health, social and behavioral sciences, and more.
  • Clinical Research Professional Certification: If your research involves clinical studies, you might consider certifications such as the Association of Clinical Research Professionals (ACRP) or the Society of Clinical Research Associates (SoCRA) certification. These certifications focus on the ethical conduct of clinical trials and research.
  • Doctoral Degree in Public Health: Pursuing a Ph.D. provides advanced research skills and opportunities.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

Strong research skills, data analysis expertise, effective communication, and a passion for public health research are essential for success as a Public Health Researcher. Additionally, being able to design and implement studies that address public health questions is crucial in this role.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Salary Range ($62,000 and $100,000)
  • Job Outlook (26%)

Public Health Researchers’ salaries vary based on experience, location, and employer. On average, researchers can earn between $62,000 and $100,000 per year. The job outlook for health researchers is 26%, with ongoing demand for researchers to inform public health policies.


14. Infectious Disease Specialist


An Infectious Disease Specialist diagnoses, treats, and manages illnesses caused by pathogens, working to prevent and control the spread of infections within individuals and communities.

As an Infectious Disease Specialist

You are expected to focus on diagnosing, treating, and preventing infections caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. Infectious Disease Specialists play a crucial role in managing infectious diseases and preventing outbreaks.

Benefits

  • Personal Fulfillment: Knowing that your work directly contributes to preventing and treating infectious diseases can be personally rewarding.
  • Interdisciplinary Collaboration: Specialists work alongside healthcare professionals, epidemiologists, researchers, and public health officials.
  • Diverse Pathogens: The role involves working with a wide range of infectious agents, contributing to a dynamic and intellectually stimulating career.

Working Conditions

Infectious Disease Specialists work in hospitals, clinics, research institutions, and public health departments. They collaborate with healthcare teams, epidemiologists, and infection control specialists.

Further Studies

  • Board Certification in Infectious Disease: This is the primary certification for Infectious Disease Specialists. It’s awarded by the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM). To become certified, you need to complete an internal medicine residency, followed by a fellowship in infectious diseases, and then pass the board examination.
  • HIV Specialist Certification: The American Academy of HIV Medicine offers a certification for healthcare professionals specializing in treating and managing HIV/AIDS. This certification demonstrates your expertise in providing comprehensive care to individuals living with HIV.
  • Travel Medicine Certification: The International Society of Travel Medicine offers a certificate in travel medicine for healthcare professionals interested in providing pre-travel consultations, vaccinations, and health advice for travelers.
  • Infection Control Certification: Organizations such as the Certification Board of Infection Control and Epidemiology (CBIC) offer certification in infection control. This is valuable for specialists who focus on preventing healthcare-associated infections.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

Being a successful Infectious Disease Specialist calls for solid medical knowledge, skill in diagnosing, critical thinking, and a thorough grasp of infectious diseases. Moreover, staying informed about new infectious disease trends and working with different teams is highly important in this role.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Average Salary ($150,000)
  • Job Outlook (26%)

Infectious Disease Specialists’ salaries vary based on experience, location, and healthcare setting. On average, Infectious Disease Specialists can earn about $150,000 per year. The job outlook for this role is 26%, with the need for specialists to address infectious disease challenges.


15. Maternal and Child Health Specialist


A Maternal and Child Health Specialist focuses on promoting and improving the well-being and healthcare of mothers and children through specialized programs, interventions, and policies.

As a Maternal and Child Health Specialist

You will focus on improving the health and well-being of pregnant women, mothers, and children. Maternal and Child Health Specialists develop and implement programs to address maternal and child health issues, promote healthy pregnancies, and support child development.

Benefits

  • Job Satisfaction: Contributing to the health and well-being of mothers and children can be personally fulfilling.
  • Interdisciplinary Collaboration: Maternal and child health specialists work with healthcare professionals, pediatricians, midwives, social workers, and educators.
  • Global Health Impact: Maternal and child health specialists may engage in international work, addressing health disparities and promoting health equity.

Working Conditions

Maternal and Child Health Specialists work in public health departments, non-profit organizations, and healthcare facilities. They collaborate with healthcare providers, social workers, and community organizations.

Further Studies

  • Certified Lactation Counselor (CLC): This certification focuses on lactation management and provides professionals with the skills to support breastfeeding mothers and infants. CLCs offer guidance on breastfeeding techniques, common challenges, and solutions.
  • Certified Professional Midwife (CPM): For MCH specialists interested in maternal care during pregnancy, labor, and childbirth, becoming a CPM could be an option. This certification allows individuals to provide midwifery services in homes, birth centers, and other settings.
  • Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP): This training program is designed for healthcare professionals involved in the care of newborns, teaching them essential skills for managing and resuscitating infants in need of immediate attention.
  • Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS): MCH specialists who work with children can benefit from PALS training, which equips them with the knowledge and skills to manage pediatric emergencies and resuscitation.
  • Master’s in Public Health (MPH) with a focus on Maternal and Child Health: Pursuing an advanced degree provides specialized knowledge in this field.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

Strong knowledge of maternal and child health issues, empathy, cultural competence, and effective communication are essential for success as a Maternal and Child Health Specialist. Additionally, being able to design and implement programs that address the unique needs of mothers and children is crucial in this role.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Salary Range ($58,000 and $96,000)
  • Job Outlook (16%)

Maternal and Child Health Specialists’ salaries vary based on experience, location, and employer. Maternal and Child Health Specialists can earn an average between $58,000 and $96,000 per year. The job outlook for this role is 16%, with a growing focus on maternal and child health initiatives.

Making the Right Career Choice

Choosing a path in public health opens opportunities to create real change in people’s lives, addressing important health issues and advocating for widespread wellness. This field offers ways to prevent diseases, shape health policies, and empower communities to lead healthier lives across different contexts and cultures.

As you consider your potential journey within the realm of public health, reflect on your unique strengths, passions, and goals. Think about the aspects of the field that resonate most with you – whether it’s disease prevention, health education, policy influence, or global health efforts. Matching your interests with the diverse possibilities within public health sets the stage for a fulfilling journey marked by meaningful influence, positive transformation, and a lasting legacy in the domain of health and well-being.


Agwaonye Samuel

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