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Top 15 Human Resource Degree Jobs

By Ammar Ahmed

Published:

Human resources is a diverse field with many different career options. Whether you’re interested in working with employees, recruiting new talent, or managing the company’s benefits, there’s an HR job out there for you.

However, some roles require years of experience, while others are entry-level positions.

In this article, we will explore the top 15 human resource degree jobs, providing a comprehensive guide to help you discover the perfect career fit that aligns with your education and aspirations.

Here are the top fifteen jobs at a glance:

  • Vice President of Talent Acquisition
  • Compensation Manager
  • HR Project Manager
  • HR Consultant
  • HR Business Partner
  • Human Resources Manager
  • Recruiter
  • HR Information Systems (HRIS) Manager
  • Project Management Specialist
  • Workplace Diversity and Inclusion Manager
  • Training and Development Manager
  • HR Generalist
  • HR Assistant
  • HR Compliance Manager
  • HR Data Analyst
degree guide human resource

1. Vice President of Talent Acquisition


As a professional with a Human Resource degree, a rewarding career option is becoming a Vice President of Talent Acquisition.

As Vice President of Talent Acquisition

Your primary focus will be on designing and implementing talent acquisition initiatives aligned with the company’s strategic goals. You will lead a team of recruiters and collaborate with business leaders to identify talent needs, streamline recruitment processes, and create a strong employer brand.

Benefits

  • Executive Healthcare Package: As a Vice President of Talent Acquisition, you may be offered a comprehensive healthcare package that includes premium medical, dental, and vision coverage, along with a wide range of wellness programs.
  • Expense Account: Many organizations provide an expense account for high-ranking positions like Vice President of Talent Acquisition, which can be used for recruiting events, business meetings, travel expenses, and other job-related costs.
  • Competitive Retirement Plans: The position often includes a robust retirement package with higher employer-matching contributions to help secure your financial future.
  • Executive Bonuses: Beyond a competitive base salary, a Vice President of Talent Acquisition often receives a significant bonus structure that is tied to the company’s performance and their personal KPI achievements.

Working Conditions

As a Vice President of Talent Acquisition, you will operate in a fast-paced and challenging environment, collaborating with cross-functional teams and staying updated with industry trends. You will have flexible working hours, with occasional travel for recruitment events and industry conferences.

Further Studies

  • Master’s Degree in Human Resources Management (MHRM): A master’s degree provides a comprehensive understanding of human resources, diving into advanced areas such as talent management, HR analytics, and strategic HRM. This degree could enhance your strategic thinking skills and your ability to align talent acquisition with broader organizational goals.
  • Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR): This advanced certification provided by HR Certification Institute (HRCI) is focused on the strategic aspects of HR management, including talent acquisition and retention. SPHR can enhance your credibility and demonstrate your readiness for leadership roles in HR.
  • SHRM Senior Certified Professional (SHRM-SCP): This globally recognized certification offered by the Society for Human Resource Management signifies your ability to develop strategies, lead the HR function, foster influence in the community, analyze performance metrics, and align HR strategies to organizational goals. This credential is quite valuable for HR leaders like a VP of Talent Acquisition.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

To excel in this role, you need exceptional leadership, communication, and negotiation skills. You must be adept at talent sourcing, candidate evaluation, and employer branding strategies. Strong data analysis and HR technology knowledge are also essential.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Average Salary ($181,876)
  • Job Outlook (8%)

Vice Presidents of Talent Acquisition earn competitive salaries, with a median annual wage of $181,876. The job outlook is good, as there is a continued demand for skilled human resources professionals who can attract top talent to drive organizational success. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the projected growth rate for HR specialists including the VP of Talent Acquisition is 8% which is faster than average.


2. Compensation Manager


As a Compensation Manager, you oversee the design and implementation of employee compensation programs to attract and retain top talent while ensuring fair and competitive pay practices.

As a Compensation Manager

Your role involves conducting market research, analyzing salary data, and developing compensation strategies aligned with organizational goals. Strong analytical, communication, and negotiation skills are essential for successful compensation management.

Your Human Resource degree equips you with a comprehensive understanding of HR practices and compensation principles, making you a valuable asset in developing and managing compensation programs to drive employee satisfaction and organizational success.

Benefits

  • Competitive Salary: Due to the role’s specialized nature, compensation managers often command high salaries.
  • Comprehensive Benefit Plans: As a benefit expert, companies often offer extensive healthcare and retirement benefits to their Compensation Managers, ensuring they are well taken care of.
  • Cross-Functional Interaction: Collaborate with various departments, providing a broad understanding of the organization and aiding in career growth.
  • Professional Development: Compensation Managers have the opportunity to learn and grow in their field, and many employers offer tuition reimbursement or other educational benefits.

Working Conditions

As a Compensation Manager, you’ll work in an office environment, leading compensation programs and strategies. Your role involves conducting data analysis, collaborating with HR and management teams, and ensuring compliance with compensation regulations. Expect a dynamic and rewarding position, with opportunities to make a significant impact on employee satisfaction and organizational success.

Further Studies

  • Master’s Degree in Human Resources Management:  An MHRM can provide a deeper understanding of HR policies, regulations, and trends. You’ll delve into areas like talent management, workforce planning, and of course, compensation and benefits, learning how to devise strategic and fair compensation plans.
  • Certified Compensation Professional (CCP): This certification, offered by WorldatWork, is a gold standard in the field of compensation. It covers critical areas like regulatory practices, quantitative analysis, and compensation program design, providing the specialized knowledge that could set you apart as a leader in the field.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

A strong candidate for the Compensation Manager position possesses a combination of analytical, communication, and leadership skills. They excel in conducting market research, analyzing salary data, and developing strategic compensation plans.

Effective communication allows them to present complex compensation information to stakeholders. Leadership skills enable them to lead compensation teams and collaborate with HR and management, ensuring fair and competitive compensation practices that attract and retain top talent.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Average Salary ($133,340)
  • Job Outlook (2%)

Compensation Managers are highly regarded for their expertise and earn a handsome salary of around $133,340 per year. The job outlook is positive, but the BLS data suggest that the number of Compensation Manager jobs will grow at a slower-than-average rate of 2% by 2031. However, as companies expand and undergo mergers or acquisitions, the need for skilled Compensation Managers will become even more apparent.


3. HR Project Manager


As a project manager, you lead and oversee HR initiatives, from talent acquisition projects to HR process improvements, ensuring successful project delivery.

As an HR Project Manager

Your role involves defining project scopes, managing budgets, and coordinating cross-functional teams. You analyze HR data and implement strategies aligned with organizational goals. Strong leadership, communication, and project management skills are essential for driving HR project success.

Benefits

  • Networking: Frequent interaction with stakeholders both internal and external, helping build a robust professional network.
  • Professional Growth Opportunities: There will be multiple opportunities for learning and growth as you handle different projects with unique challenges.
  • High Demand: Companies often require HR project managers to streamline their HR initiatives, meaning plenty of job opportunities.
  • Competitive Salary: Project managers typically receive competitive salaries, reflecting their crucial role.

Working Conditions

As an HR Project Manager, you’ll work in a fast-paced office setting, overseeing HR initiatives and projects. Your role involves collaborating with cross-functional teams, managing project timelines, and ensuring alignment with organizational goals. Expect challenges and rewards in driving successful HR projects, utilizing strong leadership and communication skills to achieve project objectives.

Further Studies

  • Master’s in Project Management (MPM): An MPM program equips you with the necessary skills to manage complex projects effectively. You’ll learn about project lifecycle management, budgeting, risk management, and leadership—critical skills for an HR project manager. Most MPM programs expect an undergraduate degree in a related field, so your bachelor’s degree should suffice for entry.
  • Project Management Professional (PMP): Offered by the Project Management Institute (PMI), the PMP certification is one of the most highly respected certifications in project management worldwide. It covers key areas like initiating, planning, executing, monitoring, controlling, and closing projects. The PMP requires a mix of education and professional experience, and it can be a powerful demonstration of your project management skills.
  • Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM): Also offered by PMI, the CAPM is a valuable entry-level certification for project practitioners who have less professional experience. It covers fundamental project management knowledge and terminology and can be a stepping stone toward more advanced certifications like the PMP.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

A strong candidate for an HR Project Manager position possesses excellent project management skills, including planning, execution, and monitoring. They demonstrate leadership abilities to lead cross-functional teams and ensure project alignment with organizational goals.

Strong communication and collaboration skills enable them to engage with stakeholders effectively. Analytical and problem-solving skills help them make data-driven decisions, ensuring successful HR project delivery and driving positive organizational outcomes.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Average Salary ($95,050)
  • Job Outlook (7%)

Being an HR Project Manager, you can earn an average annual salary of $95,050. The job outlook for HR Project Managers is positive as organizations increasingly recognize the importance of effective project management in driving HR initiatives and achieving business objectives. The Bureau of Labor Statistics research suggests an estimated 7% growth in this field from 2021 to 2031.

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4. HR Consultant


A career as an HR Consultant is a fulfilling option for those with a Human Resources degree. As a consultant, you provide expert HR advice and solutions to businesses, offering guidance on talent acquisition, employee relations, policy development, and compliance.

As an HR Consultant

Your role involves working with diverse clients, analyzing their HR needs, and providing tailored strategies to meet their objectives. You may assist with HR audits, training programs, and organizational development. Strong communication and problem-solving skills are essential for building client relationships and delivering valuable HR insights.

Benefits

  • Autonomy: As a consultant, you’ll often have a high degree of control over your work, including the projects you choose to work on and the methods you use to achieve your objectives.
  • Potential for High Earnings: HR Consultants often have the opportunity for higher earnings based on the value they bring to clients, especially when they work independently or at a senior level
  • Flexibility in Work Environment: HR consulting often comes with the ability to work remotely or travel to different client locations, providing variety in your work environment.
  • Skill Enhancement: Working with diverse clients and industries helps you continually develop and refine your HR skills.

Working Conditions

As an HR Consultant, you’ll experience a dynamic work environment, collaborating with diverse clients and industries. Your role involves providing expert HR advice, conducting assessments, and designing tailored solutions. Expect project-based work, autonomy in managing projects, and the potential for remote or flexible work arrangements. Strong communication and problem-solving skills are essential for success.

Further Studies

  • Master’s in Human Resource Management (MHRM): An MHRM offers an in-depth understanding of HR concepts and practices, equipping you with the advanced knowledge that organizations expect from a consultant. This degree will enhance your strategic decision-making capabilities and your understanding of key HR functions.
  • Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) Certifications: SHRM offers the Certified Professional (SHRM-CP) for early- and mid-career professionals and the Senior Certified Professional (SHRM-SCP) for senior-level practitioners. These certifications demonstrate your commitment to the HR field and can significantly enhance your credibility as a consultant.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

A strong candidate for an HR Consultant position possesses excellent communication and interpersonal skills to build rapport with clients. They demonstrate in-depth HR knowledge and problem-solving abilities to develop tailored solutions. Analytical and consulting expertise enables them to understand client needs, deliver valuable insights, and drive positive organizational change.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Average Salary ($87,765)
  • Job Outlook (8%)

HR Consultants earn a median annual wage of approximately $87,765 in the United States. The job outlook for HR Consultants is positive as organizations increasingly recognize the value of hiring external HR expertise to meet their workforce needs and address complex HR issues.

Employment opportunities for this role are also expected to grow at a rate similar to other HR specialist roles, at 8% from 2021 to 2031.


5. HR Business Partner


HR Business Partner is an ideal career path that allows you to leverage your HR knowledge to make a significant impact on organizational success.

As an HR Business Partner

Your main focus will be on collaborating with business leaders and managers to understand their needs and challenges related to human resources. You will act as a trusted advisor, providing HR expertise and support to help achieve business goals. Your ability to integrate HR strategies with overall business strategies will be crucial in building a high performing and motivated workforce.

Benefits

  • Potential for Internal Mobility: The role of an HR Business Partner often serves as a stepping stone to other high-level positions within HR or general management, enhancing career progression.
  • Enhanced Learning Opportunities: As you’ll be dealing with various aspects of the business and its strategy, this role offers continuous learning opportunities to develop both your HR and business acumen.
  • Access to Employee Assistance Programs: Many companies offer comprehensive Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs) that provide support for personal issues, from mental health to financial counseling.
  • Paid Sabbatical Programs: Some organizations offer paid sabbatical programs that allow you to take a break from work for personal development or rest after a certain period of service.

Working Conditions

As an HR Business Partner, you can expect a dynamic work environment that demands versatility and adaptability. You’ll collaborate with various stakeholders, attend leadership meetings, and lead HR projects. Your work hours will typically follow regular office hours, but you may occasionally need to adjust your schedule to accommodate urgent matters or critical projects.

Further Studies

  • Master’s in Human Resource Management (MHRM): This degree deepens your understanding of HR practices and strategies, equipping you with the knowledge to influence business decisions at a high level. It will also allow you to explore areas such as organizational behavior and leadership in greater depth, which can be beneficial for an HR Business Partner.
  • Professional in Human Resources (PHR) or Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR): These certifications from the HR Certification Institute offer another way to validate your HR knowledge. The SPHR, which focuses on strategy and policy-making, could be particularly beneficial for HR Business Partners.
  • Strategic HR Business Partner (SHRBP) Certification: This certification, typically offered by established HR training institutions such as the Human Capital Institute (HCI), is specifically designed to enhance strategic thinking and execution in HR business partners. It emphasizes the skills needed to align HR strategy with business strategy, a key role of the HR business partner.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

Strong candidate skills for an HR Business Partner include strategic thinking to align HR with business goals, effective communication with all stakeholders, relationship-building for collaboration, problem-solving to resolve HR issues, change management for guiding transitions, and expertise in employment laws for employee relations.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Average Salary ($86,269)
  • Job Outlook (8%)

HR Business Partners have an average annual salary of $86,269. The job outlook is good, with a projected growth rate of 8% from 2021 to 2031, which is the same as for other HR specialist roles. This is because organizations are increasingly recognizing the value of strategic HR partnerships in driving success and employee satisfaction.


6. Human Resources Manager


If you have a human resources degree and are looking for a career in HR, then becoming a Human Resources Manager is a great option. You will be at the forefront of shaping the organization’s workforce, implementing HR strategies, and ensuring the overall well-being of employees.

As a Human Resource Manager

In this role, you will be responsible for overseeing the HR functions and policies within the organization. Your primary focus will be on talent acquisition, employee development, performance management, and employee relations.

You’ll work closely with business leaders and department heads to align HR strategies with the organization’s goals and needs.

Benefits

  • Professional Development Support: Many companies offer opportunities for continuous learning such as workshops, seminars, and training programs tailored for HR professionals. They might also support your pursuit of professional certifications like SPHR or SHRM-SCP.
  • Networking: Regular interaction with a broad set of internal and external stakeholders, expanding your professional network.
  • Career Advancement: A stepping stone to higher-level HR leadership roles.
  • Leadership: Oversee an HR team, fostering leadership skills and team management.

Working Conditions

As an HR Manager, you’ll work in office settings, collaborating with employees and management. Your role involves handling recruitment, training, employee relations, and strategic planning. Expect a fast-paced environment, juggling various responsibilities, and addressing HR challenges. Effective communication, problem-solving skills, and adaptability are essential for success.

Further Studies

  • Master’s in Human Resource Management (MHRM): This degree provides an in-depth understanding of human resources and can equip you with strategic management skills. MHRM programs typically cover key HR areas such as recruitment, talent management, organizational behavior, employee relations, and more, positioning you for leadership roles in HR.
  • Professional in Human Resources (PHR) or Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR): These certifications from the HR Certification Institute can further affirm your expertise in HR. The SPHR, in particular, emphasizes the strategic aspect of HR management and could be particularly beneficial for HR managers aiming for senior-level positions.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

An ideal candidate for an HR Manager position has excellent communication and interpersonal skills to build positive employee relationships. Strong leadership abilities, strategic thinking, problem-solving, and knowledge of HR practices are essential. Adaptability, empathy, and a focus on promoting a supportive work environment further improve their qualifications.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Average Salary ($84,298)
  • Job Outlook (7%)

According to data, the annual median wage for HR managers in the United States is $84,298.

As companies continue to recognize the value of a skilled HR team in maintaining a competitive edge and fostering a positive work environment, the demand for HR managers is projected to grow. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the projected growth rate for HR management positions is expected to be around 7% from 2021 to 2030.

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7. Recruiter


A career as a recruiter is an ideal choice for individuals with a Human Resource degree. You will play a pivotal role in talent acquisition, sourcing, and selecting top candidates for job openings.

As a Recruiter

Your primary responsibility is to attract and assess potential candidates for job vacancies. You strategize and execute recruitment plans, source candidates through various channels, conduct interviews, and assess qualifications.

Strong communication and interpersonal skills help you build rapport with candidates, ensuring a positive candidate experience. You work closely with hiring managers to understand job requirements, align talent acquisition strategies with organizational goals, and offer valuable insights during the selection process

Benefits

  • Building Long-Term Relationships: The role allows you to build long-term relationships with both candidates and companies, which can lead to a robust professional network.
  • Commission-Based Earnings: In many organizations, recruiters can earn commissions or bonuses based on successful placements, which can significantly boost income potential.
  • High Demand: Companies are always looking for talent, making recruiters in high demand.
  • Clear Career Path: The recruitment profession often offers a clear and structured career path, providing plenty of opportunities for advancement.

Working Conditions

As a recruiter, you’ll work in a fast-paced office environment, collaborating with hiring managers and candidates. Your role involves sourcing and screening candidates, conducting interviews, and managing multiple job openings simultaneously. Expect to use recruitment software and attend job fairs. Strong communication, time management, and adaptability are essential for success.

Further Studies

  • Master’s in Human Resource Management (MHRM): An MHRM can offer in-depth knowledge about the broader aspects of human resources, including the finer nuances of talent acquisition, retention, and employment laws, helping you approach recruitment more strategically.
  • Sourcing Training & Certifications: Being an adept source is a huge advantage in recruiting. Consider courses that teach advanced sourcing techniques, Boolean search methods, and tools to identify passive candidates.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

A strong candidate for a recruiter position possesses excellent communication skills to engage with candidates and hiring managers effectively. They demonstrate strong interpersonal abilities to build rapport and assess candidate suitability. A keen eye for talent, adaptability, and proficiency in recruitment tools enhance their success in sourcing and selecting top candidates.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Average Salary ($79,127)
  • Job Outlook (8%)

However, recruiters earn an average annual salary of $79,127. The job outlook for recruiters remains optimistic, driven by the constant need for organizations to attract top talent and maintain a competitive edge.

The job outlook for recruiters remains optimistic, driven by the constant need for organizations to attract top talent and maintain a competitive edge. Since the Bureau of Labor Statistics classifies it under the human resources specialist career cluster, you can expect a growth rate of 8% from 2021 to 2031.

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8. HR Information Systems (HRIS) Manager


As an HRIS Manager, you oversee HR technology and data systems, ensuring seamless HR operations and data management.

As an HRIS Manager,

Your role involves implementing and optimizing HRIS solutions, managing data security, and training HR staff on system usage. Strong analytical, technical, and communication skills are essential for successful HRIS management.

Your Human Resource degree equips you with a comprehensive understanding of HR practices and data management, making you a valuable asset in streamlining HR processes using technology.

Benefits

  • Technology Skills Enhancement: As an HRIS Manager, you’ll have the opportunity to work with and learn from the latest HR technologies, which can significantly boost your tech competency.
  • Competitive Compensation: Given the specialized technical skills required for the role, HRIS Managers often command a competitive salary compared to other HR roles.
  • High Demand: As HR becomes more data-driven, the demand for HRIS managers is increasing.
  • Vendor Management Skills: Working with various software and service vendors enhances your negotiation and vendor management skills, which can be beneficial in many other roles and contexts.

Working Conditions

As an HR Information Systems (HRIS) Manager, you’ll work in an office setting, overseeing HR technology and data systems. Your role involves implementing, managing, and optimizing HRIS solutions to streamline HR processes. Expect a dynamic and data-driven environment, collaborating with HR and IT teams to ensure smooth technology integration and efficient HR operations. Strong technical and communication skills are essential for success.

Further Studies

  • Master’s in Information Systems Management or Information Technology (IT): This degree can provide advanced knowledge and skills in managing information systems, focusing on areas like system analysis, data management, IT project management, and cybersecurity. This could be particularly beneficial for HRIS managers given the technical nature of the role.
  • Certifications in HR Technology: There are various certifications focusing on HR technology, such as the HRIP (Human Resource Information Professional) certification offered by the International Association for Human Resource Information Management (IHRIM). This certification validates your knowledge and skills in HR technology solutions and can set you apart in the field.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

A strong candidate for an HR Information Systems (HRIS) Manager position possesses a combination of technical and HR skills. They have expertise in HR technology and data systems, project management, and data analytics.

Communication and collaboration abilities enable them to work with HR and IT teams effectively. Strong problem-solving and strategic thinking skills help them optimize HR processes and leverage data insights for informed decision-making, driving organizational success.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Average Salary ($79,996)
  • Job Outlook (16%)

The average salary of an HRIS Manager is $79,996 per year. The job outlook for HRIS Managers is highly favorable as organizations continue to recognize the transformative impact of HR technology on efficiency, analytics, and employee experience. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts a 16% growth in the employment of computer and Information systems managers, including HRIS managers by 2031.

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9. Performance Management Specialist


A career as a Performance Management Specialist is an excellent option for those with a Human Resource degree. As a specialist, you focus on optimizing employee performance, conducting performance evaluations, and implementing strategies to improve workforce productivity and development.

As a Performance Management Specialist

Your role centers on evaluating employee performance, providing constructive feedback, and developing performance improvement plans. You collaborate with managers to set performance goals and align them with the organization’s objectives.

Your expertise in data analysis enables you to identify trends and opportunities for enhancing workforce efficiency and effectiveness.

Benefits

  • Skill Development: You will have the opportunity to enhance a wide range of skills, including communication, data analysis, coaching, and facilitation.
  • Competitive Compensation: Performance Management Specialists often receive competitive salary packages due to the strategic importance of their role.
  • Exposure to Human Capital Analytics: You’ll have the opportunity to work with human capital analytics, enhancing your understanding of this important area of HR.

Working Conditions

As a Performance Management Specialist, you’ll work in an office environment, collaborating with HR professionals and managers. Your role involves evaluating employee performance, providing feedback, and designing improvement plans. Expect a mix of data analysis, coaching, and communication to optimize workforce productivity and development. Strong organization and interpersonal skills are essential for success.

Further Studies

  • Master’s in Industrial/Organizational Psychology: This program delves into human behavior in the workplace. It covers how to measure performance, employee motivation, leadership effectiveness, and organizational development, all of which are important for a Performance Management Specialist.
  • Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) Certifications: Both the SHRM SHRM-CP and SHRM-SCP certifications can validate your HR expertise and commitment to the field. They also cover performance management as part of their competency and knowledge exams.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

A strong candidate for a Performance Management Specialist position possesses excellent data analysis skills to assess performance metrics effectively. They demonstrate strong communication and coaching abilities to provide constructive feedback and support to employees. Their strategic thinking and talent development expertise optimize workforce productivity and align performance with organizational goals.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Average Salary ($77,603)
  • Job Outlook (8%)

The median annual salary for Performance Management Specialist is $77,603. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) classifies this role under the HR specialist career cluster. As a result, the job outlook for this occupation is also projected to grow by 8% from 2021 to 2030.

This growth is anticipated due to the increasing importance of performance evaluation and talent development in today’s competitive business landscape. Organizations are striving to optimize their human capital, retain top talent, and foster a culture of continuous improvement, making the role of performance management specialists indispensable.


10. Workplace Diversity and Inclusion Manager


A career as a Workplace Diversity and Inclusion Manager is a great option for those with a Human Resources degree. You will focus on creating an inclusive workplace culture, promoting diversity, and ensuring equal opportunities for all employees.

As a Workplace Diversity and Inclusion Manager

Your role centers on developing and implementing diversity and inclusion initiatives. You collaborate with HR professionals and leadership to create policies that support diverse hiring practices and employee engagement. You conduct diversity training, promote awareness, and address bias and discrimination.

Benefits

  • Recognition of Efforts: Successful diversity and inclusion initiatives often get recognized both within and outside the organization, leading to professional recognition and satisfaction.
  • Innovation and Creativity: The role encourages innovative and creative thinking to address diversity and inclusion challenges, keeping the job exciting and fulfilling.
  • Continuous Learning: The ever-evolving nature of diversity and inclusion ensures that you’re continuously learning and staying abreast of new trends and best practices in the field.
  • Skill Development: The role requires a wide range of skills including communication, empathy, adaptability, and leadership, providing plenty of opportunities for personal growth and skill development.

Working Conditions

As a Workplace Diversity and Inclusion Manager, you’ll work in an office setting, collaborating with HR professionals and company leadership. Your role involves developing and implementing diversity initiatives, conducting training, and advocating for an inclusive work culture. Expect a dynamic and rewarding environment, promoting equality and fostering a positive employee experience. Strong communication and interpersonal skills are essential.

Further Studies

  • Master’s in Diversity and Inclusion: Some universities now offer this specialized degree, which provides in-depth knowledge and skills specific to leading D&I initiatives. It covers topics such as social justice, intercultural communication, inclusive leadership, and diversity law.
  • Cornell Certified Diversity Professional/Advanced Practitioner (CCDP/AP): This certification, offered by Cornell University, provides a comprehensive understanding of strategic D&I management, laws, and regulations. It is an excellent choice for professionals seeking to gain advanced, practical skills in this field.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

A strong candidate for a Workplace Diversity and Inclusion Manager position possesses excellent communication and interpersonal skills to advocate for diversity and foster an inclusive work environment. They demonstrate cultural competency, leadership abilities, and an understanding of HR practices to drive positive change and promote equality within the organization.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • verage Salary ($84,631)
  • Job Outlook (7%)

On average, a Workplace Diversity and Inclusion Manager earns $84,631. The job outlook for this role is promoting, as companies now understand that diverse teams bring a range of perspectives, ideas, and experiences, leading to improved innovation, creativity, and decision-making. Besides, the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects 7% job growth for Training and Development Managers, which also includes Diversity Managers.


11. Training and Development Manager


Training and Development Managers design and implement employee training programs, foster professional growth, and enhance workforce skills. A Human Resource degree is ideal for this career.

As a Training and Development Manager

Your role centers on assessing training needs, creating learning initiatives, and delivering engaging training sessions. You collaborate with HR professionals and business leaders to align training with organizational goals.

Your strong communication and presentation skills help you effectively convey knowledge and skills to employees.

Benefits

  • Constant Learning: The nature of the role means that you will always be learning about new training methods, technologies, and developments in your industry.
  • Leadership Opportunities: This role often involves leading a team of trainers or training coordinators, providing opportunities to enhance your leadership skills.
  • Future-Proof Role: The role often involves keeping up-to-date with future workforce needs and skills, making it an evolving and future-proof profession.
  • Facilitation Skills: Designing and leading training sessions can improve your facilitation skills, which are beneficial in a variety of professional contexts.

Working Conditions

As a Training and Development Manager, you’ll work in an office setting, collaborating with HR professionals and department heads. Your role involves assessing training needs, designing programs, and delivering training sessions. 

Expect a dynamic and rewarding environment, facilitating employee growth, and promoting a culture of continuous learning. Strong communication and organizational skills are essential for success.

Further Studies

  • Master’s in Organizational Development (OD): OD focuses on improving organizational performance and individual development by increasing alignment among the various systems within the organization. This can be especially valuable for a Training and Development Manager since it enhances understanding of how to drive change and performance improvements.
  • Certified Professional in Training Management (CPTM): This certification from Training Industry is specifically designed for those in a training and development leadership role. It emphasizes business alignment, leadership, and the management and measurement of training.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

They demonstrate strong communication and leadership abilities to effectively manage training teams and collaborate with stakeholders. An understanding of adult learning principles and talent development strategies further enhances their capability to drive employee growth and organizational success.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Average Salary ($77,754)
  • Job Outlook (7%)

As of the latest available data, the median annual wage for training and development managers in the United States is approximately $77,754.  According to Bureau of Labor Statistics projections, the employment of training and development managers is expected to grow at a rate of 7% from 2021 to 2030. The growth is driven by the recognition that a skilled and well-trained workforce is essential for an organization’s success.


12. HR Generalist


A career as an HR Generalist is an excellent choice for those with a Human Resource degree. As a generalist, you work across various HR functions, handling recruitment, employee relations, benefits administration, and policy implementation.

As an HR Generalist

Your role involves recruiting and onboarding new hires, managing employee relations, conducting performance reviews, and handling HR-related inquiries. You ensure compliance with employment laws, maintain employee records, and support HR projects. Strong communication and problem-solving skills are essential for success.

Benefits

  • Competitive Compensation: HR Generalists often receive competitive compensation packages, especially as they gain experience and take on more responsibilities.
  • Holistic Understanding: Gain a comprehensive view of HR, understanding how different functions interconnect.
  • Job Security: As HR Generalists handle multiple functions within HR, they are usually considered indispensable, providing a degree of job security.
  • Career Advancement Opportunities: The broad knowledge and experience gained in this role can provide a stepping stone to more specialized or senior HR roles.

Working Conditions

As an HR Generalist, you’ll work in an office setting, handling various HR functions. Your role involves recruitment, employee relations, benefits administration, and policy implementation. Expect a fast-paced environment, working with employees and managers. Strong communication and problem-solving skills are essential for managing diverse HR responsibilities and fostering a positive work environment.

Further Studies

  • Master’s in Business Administration (MBA) with a focus on Human Resources: An MBA provides a broad understanding of business operations, which can be useful in aligning HR strategies with overall business objectives. Specializing in HR allows you to delve deeper into areas like talent management, organizational behavior, and employee performance. Some schools may require prerequisite courses in basic accounting, statistics, or economics if these subjects were not part of your bachelor’s program.
  • Professional in Human Resources (PHR) Certification: The PHR certification offered by the HR Certification Institute (HRCI) is one of the most recognized certifications for HR professionals. It covers areas like talent planning and acquisition, benefits and compensation, employee and labor relations, and learning and development.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

An ideal candidate for an HR Generalist position should have excellent communication and interpersonal skills to interact with employees and answer questions. They should also demonstrate strong problem-solving abilities to address HR challenges and manage various HR functions. An understanding of HR principles, recruitment, employee relations, and compliance is essential for success in this versatile role.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Average Salary ($60,045)
  • Job Outlook (8%)

The average annual salary of an HR Generalist is $60,045. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that the employment of human resources specialists, including HR Generalists, will grow by 8% from 2021 to 2031. This growth is due to the increasing demand for HR professionals to support organizations’ focus on talent management and compliance with evolving labor laws and regulations.


13. HR Assistant


As an assistant, you support HR operations, handle administrative tasks, and assist in recruitment, onboarding, and employee record maintenance.

As an HR Assistant

Your role involves managing HR documentation, scheduling interviews, and coordinating training programs. You provide support to employees regarding HR policies and inquiries. Strong organizational and communication skills are essential for efficiently assisting HR professionals.

Benefits

  • Entry Point: Provides a stepping stone into the field of HR for recent graduates or those changing careers.
  • Exposure to Multiple HR Functions: As an HR Assistant, you will often be involved in various HR functions such as recruitment, employee relations, and benefits, providing a diverse work experience.
  • Professional Growth: Many organizations offer opportunities for HR Assistants to advance in their HR careers through professional development, training, and mentoring opportunities.

Working Conditions

As an HR Assistant, you’ll work in an office setting, supporting HR professionals in various administrative tasks. Your role involves managing HR documentation, assisting in recruitment, and providing employee support. Expect a fast-paced environment, collaborating with HR team members and employees. Strong organizational and communication skills are essential for success.

Further Studies

  • Master’s in Human Resource Management (MHRM): This advanced degree provides comprehensive knowledge of HR practices and principles, enabling HR Generalists to handle complex challenges and take on leadership roles.
  • Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) Certifications: The SHRM Certified Professional (SHRM-CP) is designed for HR professionals early in their career, while the SHRM Senior Certified Professional (SHRM-SCP) is for senior-level practitioners. Both can validate your HR expertise and dedication to the field.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

A strong candidate for an HR Assistant position possesses excellent organizational and administrative skills to manage HR documentation and tasks efficiently. They demonstrate strong communication and interpersonal abilities to provide employee support and collaborate with HR professionals.

Attention to detail, time management, and a basic understanding of HR practices contribute to their effectiveness in supporting HR operations and promoting a positive work environment.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Average Salary ($43,463)

The median annual wage for human resources assistants in the United States is around $43,463.  While advancements in technology have automated some HR tasks, the need for HR Assistants remains relevant for managing employee data, assisting with recruitment processes, and handling administrative duties. Expect a similar growth rate as for other HR specialist roles.


14. HR Compliance Manager


As an officer, you ensure adherence to HR laws, regulations, and company policies, mitigating risks and promoting a compliant workplace.

As an HR Compliance Officer

Your role involves conducting audits, developing HR policies, and providing guidance on legal matters. You collaborate with HR teams and management to address compliance issues and promote ethical practices. Strong analytical and communication skills are essential for ensuring HR practices align with regulatory requirements.

Benefits

  • Professional Recognition: This role is highly respected, as it plays a vital part in safeguarding the company’s reputation and legal standing.
  • Conflict Resolution Skills: You’ll gain valuable experience in resolving conflicts between company operations and regulatory requirements.
  • Professional Development: Many organizations offer opportunities for continuous learning, such as compliance certification programs.
  • Business Acumen: Understanding how compliance impacts various aspects of the business can enhance your business acumen.

Working Conditions

As an HR Compliance Manager, you’ll work in an office setting, overseeing HR policies and practices to ensure legal compliance. Your role involves conducting audits, analyzing data, and advising management on compliance strategies. Expect a challenging yet rewarding environment, contributing to a compliant workplace and minimizing legal risks. Strong analytical and communication skills are essential for success.

Further Studies

  • Master’s in Employment Law or Juris Doctor (JD): For a role heavily focused on legal compliance, advanced knowledge in employment law can be greatly beneficial. A Master’s in Employment Law or a JD degree provides a deep understanding of the legal landscape affecting businesses and employees.
  • Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) Certifications: Both the SHRM Certified Professional (SHRM-CP) and SHRM Senior Certified Professional (SHRM-SCP) certifications can validate your HR expertise and commitment to the field. They cover compliance as part of their competency and knowledge exams.
  • Certified Compliance and Ethics Professional (CCEP): Offered by the Compliance Certification Board, this certification validates your knowledge of compliance and ethics programs in businesses.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

A strong candidate for an HR Compliance Manager position possesses in-depth knowledge of HR laws, regulations, and compliance frameworks. They demonstrate strong analytical skills to conduct audits and assess data for compliance assessments.

Effective communication and collaboration abilities enable them to work with HR teams and management to implement policies and strategies. Ethical awareness and attention to detail ensure a fair and compliant workplace.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Average Salary ($78,707)
  • Job Outlook (7%)

HR compliance managers earn an average annual salary of $78,707. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics classifies this role under the same career cluster as an HR manager, hence the job outlook looks promising with an estimated 7% growth from 2021 to 2031.

This is due to the increasing emphasis on regulatory compliance and the need for organizations to mitigate legal risks. Businesses are constantly seeking HR Compliance experts to help them navigate complex compliance landscapes and avoid potential legal issues.


15. HR Data Analyst


With a human resources degree, you can pursue a career as an HR Data Analyst. You will play a crucial role in driving HR strategies and decision-making through data-driven insights.

As an HR Data Analyst

Your main focus will be on collecting, analyzing, and interpreting HR data to provide valuable insights to HR teams and management. You will work with large datasets, conduct statistical analyses, and create data visualizations to support recruitment, employee engagement, performance management, and other HR functions.

Benefits

  • In-Demand Skills: Data skills are in high demand, increasing your marketability and job security.
  • Upskilling and Reskilling: As data tools and technologies evolve, there are ample opportunities for upskilling and reskilling in this role.
  • Future Opportunities: The skills and experiences you gain as an HR Data Analyst can open doors to other roles in data analysis, HR, and beyond.
  • Decision-Making Autonomy: Depending on the organization, you may have the autonomy to decide which data to analyze and how, fostering your creativity and independence.

Working Conditions

As an HR Data Analyst, you will typically work in office settings, collaborating with HR professionals and utilizing data analysis tools and software. Your work will involve transforming raw data into actionable reports and recommendations to support HR initiatives.

Further Studies

  • Master’s in Business Analytics or Data Science: These programs delve into advanced data analysis techniques, statistical methods, machine learning, and predictive modeling, all of which can be very useful for an HR Data Analyst. Prior knowledge of statistics and some programming languages might be required.
  • Certifications in Relevant Software Tools: Certifications in data visualization tools like Tableau, PowerBI, or HR-specific software can be advantageous in demonstrating your technical skills.

What Skills Make You a Strong Candidate

To excel in this role, you must have strong analytical skills, proficiency in data analysis tools (e.g., Excel, SQL, Python), and the ability to communicate complex findings to non-technical stakeholders. Knowledge of HR metrics and practices is essential to provide meaningful insights.

Salary Range & Job Outlook

  • Average Salary ($65,379)
  • Job Outlook (36%)

HR Data Analyst earns an average salary of $65,379 per year. The job outlook for data analysts is exceptionally positive. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that employment in data analytics will expand by 36% from 2021 to 2031, much faster than the average for all occupations.

This growth is being driven by the increasing demand for data-driven decision-making across all industries. As businesses become more reliant on data to gain a competitive edge, skilled data analysts will be in high demand.

Related Article

Making the Right Career Choice

A Human Resource degree opens up diverse and rewarding career opportunities across industries.

To make the right choice, consider your strengths, interests, and career goals. Evaluate job prospects, growth potential, and alignment with your values.

The right HR career is out there for you. Use our article as a starting point, and don’t be afraid to explore your options.  Stay updated on HR trends and be prepared to adapt as the HR landscape evolves.

With our guide to help you, you can take the right steps and start your journey in Human Resources with confidence. There are exciting opportunities waiting for you in this ever-changing field.


Ammar Ahmed

About the Author

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